Hello —

If you currently teach middle school, THIS IS FOR YOU!

In my travels throughout the Hudson Division, I am constantly asked
“what can be done to bring young people into Amateur Radio?”  As
you know, years ago middle (junior) and high schools were rife with
Amateur Radio clubs.  Sadly, that is no longer the case.

Many of us were influenced in our youth by Amateur Radio and chose
careers in related fields.  Through our experience with Amateur Radio,
we learned how to communicate with others as we developed broader
interpersonal skills and a larger view of the world.  Recent efforts to
engage the youth audience have had only limited success.   Adding insult
to injury, funding for training and sustaining such a club operation is
at the very bottom of most school priority lists.

I know that some of our Division club members, who are not pedagogues,
have approached their local schools with a sincere offer to volunteer
their time to come in to these schools and teach students, enabling
them to get their licenses.  Unfortunately, that is virtually
impossible in today’s environment given needs for tighter security,
liability and safety issues, and the need to have complete integration
to the specific STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics) educational curriculum which is very demanding and leaves
little to no room to include Amateur Radio in most school programs.

SO, WHAT DO WE DO NOW??

I’m proposing that we start a pilot program in the Hudson Division
that will encourage hands-on learning in an informal club environment
that provides an enrichment opportunity for students while also
providing the kind of instruction that they would have received in a
more formal classroom setting.

I am looking to recruit a working faculty member of a middle school who
is also a licensed Amateur.  This teacher would start an Amateur Radio
club in his/her school.  As it is imperative that the kids who
participate in the club have the ability to have “hands-on”
experience, the club would be provided with the resources necessary to
make this a success.

Our teacher would be provided materials, a funding commitment from ARRL
to acquire startup equipment (through the generosity of a fellow Ham
sponsor who has offered to earmark a donation to ARRL for this specific
purpose), and instructional help using a mentor. We are thrilled to be
able to offer the volunteer services of an active ham who has taught
for many years as a middle school science teacher and is now an Adjunct
Professor of Education at a local college.  This individual would
provide guidance in helping to develop a program for our “club”
teacher.

If you are a current middle school faculty member with your subject
area in the STEM disciplines, a licensed Radio Amateur, and would like
to be part of this initiative as we establish this pilot program,
please contact me.

Tnx es 73 de Mike N2YB