Hudson Division Beacon – March 2004

ARRL Hudson Division

March 2004

Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition  – # 36

By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL

30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596

(516) 746-7652

n2ff@arrl.org

Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all.  I am off to Dallas this weekend for a
meeting of the ARRL Executive Committee.  While I may have some warmer
weather I will, unfortunately, miss two local hamfests – The Cherryville
RA Hamfest on Saturday and the Orange County ARC Hamfest on Sunday in
New Winsdsor, NY.  But hopefully you will all be there to meet the
friendly folk in both clubs and to check out the fleas.  It’s almost
time for spring antenna projects.

* ED HARE SPREADS THE WORD ON BPL IN NNJ

Almost 80 people turned out for ARRL staffer, Ed Hare, W1RFI’s talk on
BPL in early March.  The audience came away with a good understanding of
the potential interference problems associated with the new technology.
The 10-70 Repeater Association, Inc. hosted the meeting on Wednesday,
March 3, 2004 at the Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute in
Mahwah.  Thanks to Hudson Division Vice Director Joyce Birmingham,
KA2ANF, for making arrangements for use of the hall and inviting Ed
Hare, W1RFI, to come down from Newington for the event.  Thanks also to
those w ho turned out for the evening especially the 1-70 and BARA
members.  I t was good to see you there.

> FCC approves NPRM for BPL

The FCC is taking the next step toward authorizing BPL (Broadband over
Power Lines), whose potential interference threatens Amateur Radio
operations on the bands between 2.0 and 60 MHz. FCC Commissioners
unanimously approved a Notice of Proposed Rule Making for the deployment
of BPL under Part 15 rules on unlicensed devices. The NPRM would require
BPL providers to apply “adaptive” interference mitigation techniques
after their systems cause interference.

ARRL CEO David Summer, K1ZZ, commented that if the FCC really believed
current Part 15 emission limits were sufficient, it would not have had
to require that BPL providers institute interference mitigation systems.
The FCC has not yet released the actual NPRM, and a presentation by the
FCC’s Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) revealed only its broad
outlines. Sumner said the League would not take a formal position until
it reviews the full NPRM.

The Notice of Inquiry on BPL that the FCC issued last April resulted in
more than 5100 comments, many from Radio Amateurs (including your
editor) pointing out the threat to their HF bands. After the NPRM is
issued hams must again voice their concerns about BPL in no uncertain
terms. How to do this will follow in future Newsletters. Stay tuned.

> FCC Chairman assures ham Congressman on BPL

FCC Chairman Michael Powell has assured US Representative Greg Walden,
WB7OCE, that the Commission will give “thorough consideration” to all
BPL studies before it takes final action. Powell responded February 3 to
Walden’s January 15 letter requesting the FCC defer any further action
in its BPL proceeding until the National Telecommunications and
Information Administration (NTIA) releases its BPL study and the public
has had a chance to comment.

“Please be assured that we have already begun coordination of this
action with NTIA,” Powell told Walden, “and that the Commission will
give all studies, including the forthcoming NTIA study, thorough
consideration prior to any final action or rules on the subject.”

Walden (R-OR), a member of the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications
and the Internet, is one of two Amateur Radio licensees in the US
House.

Sumner also said the ARRL would continue to combat the “misconception”
that BPL systems are viable as a “last mile” broadband technology for
rural dwellers. “In low-density areas, the economics just don’t work,”
he said.

The NPRM is available on the FCC Web site in Microsoft Word format

<http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-04-29A1.doc> or
as

an Adobe PDF file

<http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-04-29A1.pdf>.

Interested parties may file detailed comments on the NPRM via the main
FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS)
<http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs/>. The comment deadline is 45 days after
the NPRM has been published in The Federal Register, and that is not
expected to happen for another week or two. The FCC also is accepting
brief comments on the NPRM via its ECFS Express page

<http://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/ecfs/Upload/>.

Additional information about BPL and Amateur Radio is on the ARRL Web
site

<http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/>. To support the League’s
efforts in this area, visit the ARRL’s secure BPL Web site
<https://www.arrl.org/forms/development/donations/bpl/>.

* FCC Okays BPL Proposal; ARRL Officials Express Disappointment

(Feb 12, 2004) — The FCC today agreed unanimously–with one partial
dissent–to go forward with a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) on
the subject of Broadband over Power Line (BPL). The NPRM is the next
step in the BPL proceeding, which began last April with a Notice of
Inquiry that attracted more than 5100 comments–many from the amateur
community.

See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/02/12/5/?nc=1 for further
details.

* North Carolina Hams Experience Close BPL Encounter with FCC Chairman

(Mar 9, 2004) — A Broadband over Power Line (BPL) home demonstration in
the Raleigh, North Carolina, area March 5 provided an ideal opportunity
for area amateurs to take their concerns to FCC Chairman Michael Powell
face to face. While ARRL Public Information Officer Gary Pearce, KN4AQ,
doesn’t believe his brief encounter with the FCC head and longer
discussions with Commission and electric utility staffers will stop or
slow the seeming BPL juggernaut, they were valuable nonetheless.  See
the full story at: http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/03/09/1/?nc=1

Comment:  This is an interesting story showing what local hams can do if
they plan and stay cool.

* Leslie A. Moxon, G6XN, SK:

Leslie A. “Les” Moxon, G6XN, of Surrey, England, died March 3. He was 95
and among the oldest Amateur Radio operators in the UK.   See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/03/11/1/?nc=1 for details.

A 6 Meter Moxon Antenna” by Allen Baker, KG4JJH, is among the antenna
articles featured in April 2004 QST. First licensed in the 1920s, Moxon
had not been active in the months leading up to his death. A service was
set for March 10 in Guildford.

>  COMMENTS ON: A LICENSE STRUCTURE IS NOT HAM RADIO

I had many e-mails about last months long essay, nearly all positive.
Thanks folks.  Here are a few you may be interested in reading.

Frank,

Thank you for the expanded answer published in the Beacon. Years ago,
folks got in trouble for pointing out that the earth is not the center
of the universe, but many hams seem to think that ham radio revolves
around them and their activities whether it be code, contesting, nets,
ragchewing, certificate chasing or whatever. As Ben Franklin pointed
out, the alternative to hanging together is to hang separately.

I am particularly dismayed by fellow FISTS members who have made a big
show of “resigning” to protest the perceived anti-code stance of the
ARRL.  I use CW more than 90% of the time, but it is good to remember
that until the code proficiency requirement was “dumbed down” to 5 WPM,
it was 0% of the time, because I had no (or very limited) HF privileges.
Once I had my HF privileges, I found out that SSB running 100 W with a
simple antenna often leaves you out of the running, and that CW is
simply more effective (and, to me, more satisfying). Having guided 2 of
my kids through the driver’s license ritual, I know that you learn how
to really drive after you pass the road test.

I think the current ARRL proposal is reasonable considering political
reality. We know certain approaches that haven’t worked well: the novice
license and downgrading. Like you, I had an original novice license that
lead to nowhere (and never considered that it might have been possible
to retake the test and start again). As a technician it was rather
impractical to get any on-the-air CW practice that would have lead to 13
WPM. But why didn’t technician privileges retain at least the crippled
privileges of the lesser class? Vengefulness cast in the guise of
preventing perpetual novices. We don’t want nor need hurdles or barriers
to the entry to ham radio (but I hasten to add that 5 WPM is a pretty
low hurdle, as hurdles go).

When it gets right down to it, there seems to be an epidemic of
selfishness that sometimes shows itself as excessive power, bandwidth,
or ego and a disinclination to share. The continued health of ham radio
depends on our collective willingness to share our time, skills, and
spectrum with other radio amateurs.

73,

Bob Block

Frank,

I just web-surfed into the Hudson Div website and wanted to comment on
your long letter in the recent Beacon. It really resonated with me. I
remember in 1963 thinking that I could never be smart enough to obtain a
ham license, but with the encouragement of an 8th grade friend of mine,
I eventually madeit to Novice in 1965, got the Extra in 1967 and became
one of the few teenagers in the Hudson Division who held an Extra before
Incentive Licensing went into effect on Nov 22, 1968. (I remember that
date well, because Nov 22 is my birthday, hi). But that was in a time
long past, and in another century!

Nevertheless, I think you guys are on the right track and hope you stay
the course. Good luck.

73,

Dan Ostroy K2UL

Southern NJ Section Traffic Manager

Yep. And just for the record, Incentive Licensing was announced in 1966.
The new exams for Advanced etc went into effect in 1967, and the
restricted band segments went into effect in 1968. At least they were
kind enough to give folks 2 years to upgrade before they lost
privileges, HI.

I grew up in North Jersey, went to NYU in the city. Moved to South
Jersey when I got married in 1973.

Nice hearing from you. Have a good week. 73,

Dan K2UL

Kudos, Frank! (Feb. Beacon)

We both had similar experiences, licensing-wise…I’m sure that
periodically, this hobby (like others) undergoes transformations (see
the hoo-haw at http://www.eham.net/articles/7541 for an “earful!”) I
think it’s sad that we have to be so divisive…the one good thing about
ham radio is that there’s something for everyone in it. Plus, if you
don’t like ANY of it, there’s even an “On/Off” switch for you to play
with.

I remember pouting a LOT about “losing” my privileges in the late ’60’s
after what I thought was an effort that had led me to earn “full”
amateur privileges (with my General). I think I even dropped out of the
hobby for a time, only to have my interest rekindled when I found out I
could get the callsign of my choice by upgrading to Extra. These people
that complain about “the good old days” and the “imminent demise of our
hobby” probably could learn a thing or two from the spark gap guys. I’m
pretty sure they thought the sky was falling, too, when the government
“restructured” the hobby as they knew it.

Life goes on…keep telling the truth, Frank, even if those around you
currently losing their heads about all this stuff. I say “Give ’em
HELL!” <G>

73,

GJ

Gerry Jurrens, N2GJ

Kingston, NJ

http://users.tellurian.com/gjurrens

http://users.tellurian.com/gjurrens/famous_hams.html

http://users.tellurian.com/gjurrens/astrohams.html

ARRL Article: http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/07/04/1/

* PLANNING SOME New DIPOLE ANTENNAS FOR HF?

Visit this site for some ideas as to what you might do if you are
ambitious:

http://www.antenna.be/rhr.html

Or you might want to visit Joe Fitzgerald wrote:

There is a very nice site near the intersection of Rte 2 and Wetherbee
St, in Acton, MA. It’s owned by W1EVT. He has 3 curtains oriented 120
degrees from one another on each band: 80, 40 20 15 and 10 meters. They
are supported by 20 Rohn 25 towers. One of the most impressive amateur
installations I have seen.

-Joe KM1P

>  Hudson Division Amateur Radio operator named teacher of the year:

Watchung Hills Regional High School teacher and ARRL member Andrew
Furlong, WA2FGK, of Bridgewater, New Jersey, has been named the school’s
teacher of the year. A graduate of Trenton State College and Rider
College, Furlong–an ARRL member–has been an educator for 37 years. A
panel representing staff, students, administrators, community members
and past teachers of the year at the Warren, New Jersey, school selected
Furlong, 60, from among the nominees. “My biggest joy is sharing what I
know with kids,” he says. An Amateur Radio operator for more than 45
years, Furlong has worked in the electronics and broadcasting
industries. He’s shared his interest in ham radio with his students,
some of whom have gone into careers in radio and electronics, and has
taught ham radio classes in the school. He’s also served as an adviser
to the school’s robotics team. Furlong will be formally recognized, with
similarly designated teachers, at a future statewide event. The Teacher
of the Year program is part of the Governor’s Teacher Recognition
Program in New Jersey.–Echoes-Sentinel

* BROTHER GEORGE CLAY, WA2RRK,  SK

Many of who came in contact with Brother George over the years will miss
him and may be interested in reading his slightly edited obituary from a
Peekskill paper below:

Funeral Services will be held here for Bro. George Clay, S.A., a
Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, who died Sunday, February 29, at St.
Joseph’s Nursing Home, Yonkers, NY. He was 88 years old. Brother George
was born Thomas Patrick Clay in Philadelphia, PA, where he graduated
from Our Lady of Victory Elementary School and West Philadelphia
Catholic High School. He entered the Franciscan Friars of the
Atonement-Graymoor in 1936, professed his first vows in 1938 and his
perpetual vows in 1941. He served his community in a variety of
administrative positions in Graymoor, including duties as assistant
director of St. Christopher’s Inn. He also was engaged in Canadian
ministries in Vancouver and Nova Scotia, and in administrative
assignments in Washington, DC and Cumberland, RI. Since 1972, he had
served as an alcoholism counselor at St. Christopher’s Inn. He was a
member of the National Clergy Council on Alcoholism, a field in which he
had engaged in specialized studies over the past number of years. In
2001, he took up residence in St. Joseph’s Nursing Home, Yonkers, NY,
where he resided until his death. For many years, Brother George was an
active ham radio operator, broadcasting with the call letters WA2RRK. He
not only communicated with many people in the United States, but also
with the friars, who were stationed overseas, especially with the friars
stationed in Brazil. Brother George was the only child of the late
Patrick and Sara Ann Jordan Clay.   (Thanks to NA2M for the obituary.)

* N2CWI, Angelo Conti SK

Long time LIMARC member Angelo Conti, N2CWI passed away on February 27
after complications from a stroke at age 89.  Angelo was extremely
helpful to local hams.  He advised me on numerous occasions on tower
repairs, removals and moves.   I will miss him and his friendly
advice.

* “HAM POST” FREE TECHNICAL NEWSLETTER  (from Jim’s GAZETTE Newsletter
#163 5 March 2004)

If you are interested in getting on PSK 31the new KF6VSG HamPost is a
must read and it’s free via email,  all 20 pages of the new quarterly
publication. George, according to Jim’s GAZETTE, has created a genuine
contribution to the amateur world, written by an expert who, in words
and pictures most of us can follow without a dictionary and technical
manual at hand, lead us to a better understanding of our technology.
The same stuff we learned too little about in our early days as an
amateur, and too often fail to understand now.

The current issue, (which is Volume 1, Issue 1) sets a very high
standard for all future issues. Look at the index of numero uno: SETTING
UP A PSK STATION, OPTIMIZING YOUR PSK31 SIGNAL, RADIO BASICS–RESONANCE,
UNDERSTANDING PATH LOSS AND SNR. And each article will be followed up in
Issue 2. It is a true treasure-trove of information and knowledge.
HamPost is published as a PDF file, making it easy to download, read and
print.

The first article is a perfect how-to article complete with reference
material, screen shots and intelligent prose. Yes, any ham should be
able to read this and, if they have a computer with sound card and an
interface, be on the air within a few hours of reading the first
paragraph. It is an excellent tutorial. And, of equal importance, there
are links to many additional informed sources that provide serious
additions to your knowledge base.

Then, once on the air, read on and understand a lot more about your
signal quality and what there is to do about bringing it into the sweet
spot. Once there you obtain the maximum mileage per watt, and read far
fewer complaints about your poor signal quality. He goes on to a kit
anybody can build and add

to the system, a kit that will give you a visual image of your output. I
have seen a good many signals that might benefit from such a product. I
just hope that mine looks good.

Do subscribe. Go to http://www.softsci.com/hamradio/opt_page.asp. Then,
if hungry for more, go to the download site and look at the free
software on www.softsci.com/hampost/download.  You can also download
issue number one from this site.  This is a major addition to our
resource bank. Get it! It is free, contains no advertising and allows
reuse in any form as long as the material is not modified in any way. No
fee may be collected for its subsequent use.

* DIVISION MEMBERS IN PRINT

For all of you who have been dying to convert an amplifier to 6 meters,
here’s an Article in the Winter 2004 Edition of CQ VHF written by George
Hall, N2CG – “Conversion of the ETO Alpha 374 HF Amplifier to a 6-meter
Monoband Linear Amplifier”. George converted an amplifier to six meters
and had contemplated writing an article about it for a couple of years.
Due to personal conflicts, George put his writing on hold. After much
encouragement from all of his local ham friends, he got busy and
produced a wonderful article! Thank you, George and Congratulations!
(de Joyce, KA2ANF)

February “CQ Magazine” had two articles by friends and division members.
Ed Madson, President of the KCRA, had an article about his experience
operating from Pitcain Island for 100 minutes.  Immediately following
that article was one by Tony Japha, N2UN, a member of the Order of
Boiled Owls.  Good reading in both articles.

The April Issue of “QST” had a number of letters from division members
in the “Correspondence” section.  On page 24 Harold Broomfield. KC2BPP
wrote “Casual RTTY Contesting” about his positive experience in
discovering RTTY Contesting during last December’s ARRL RTTY Roundup.  I
would love to have worked Harold in that contest but M/N2FF never heard
him.  He probably had not worked up the confidence to claim a frequency
and run on it by calling CQ.  I did hear Jerry, NO2T, but he was
pouncing and never seemed to settle down on a frequency so I could call
him. Meanwhile Emil, KD1F, apparently Jerry’s big competition for the
2004 Hudson Division RTTY Roundup plaque this year, is in my M/N2FF log
on two bands.

On the same page in the April issue is a letter from John Smale K2IZ,
“Elmer/Elmers.”  John is a former NLI Section Communications Manager,
(that’s what we called SM’s years ago).  Nice to hear from you both, and
nice letters.

—————————

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:

13 Mar 2004 + Cherryville Repeater Association  http://www.qsl.net/w2cra

Contact:

Cherryville Repeater Assocation, W2CRA

PO Box 308

Quakertown, NJ 08868

Phone: 908-788-4080

Email: w2cra@qsl.net

Clinton, NJ

Sect: Northern New Jersey

=====================

14 Mar 2004 + Orange County ARC  http://www.bestweb.net/~ocarc/

Contact:

Ed Moskowitz, N2XJI

123 Harold Avenue

Cornwall, NY 12518

Phone: 845-534-3492

Email: n2xji@arrl.net

New Windsor, NY

Sect: Eastern New York

======================

17 Apr 2004 + Roseland ARC

http://www.qsl.net/k2gq

Contact:

Harvey Moskowitz, W2YWC

7 Burlington Road

Livingston, NJ 07039

Phone: 973-994-0637

Email: harvmosk@aol.com

West Orange, NJ

Div: Hudson

Sect: Northern New Jersey

==============================

18 Apr 2004 + Mt. Beacon ARC

http://www.qsl.net/mbarc

Contact:

Ken Akasofu, KL7JCQ

8C Hudson Harbor Dr., Apt. #8C

Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

Phone: 845-485-9617

Email: kl7jcq@arrl.net

Poughkeepsie, NY

Div: Hudson

Sect: Eastern New York

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

Hudson Division Beacon – February 2004

ARRL Hudson Division
February 2004
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition  – # 47
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
(516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org

Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others that may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

* LIMARC Winter Hamfest on February 27 in Bethpage  –  This is the first
division hamfest of the 2005 season.  Can the Spring Thaw be far
behind?

OOPS!!!!  We had the wrong date and number on the late January issue.
Sorry about that!!!  The date and number should now be returned to
normal with the February issue.

A few comments about our trip to England: I did bring along my trusty
Icom 706 and get on HF while there and I did manage to work a few
friends back in the Hudson Division.  But it was very few.  Conditions
were not good.  The day after we arrived was the ARRL Ten Meter contest,
one of my favorites.  There were very few stations heard and none from
the USA.  I worked a total of nine QSOs on Saturday and Sunday and did
not bother to submit a log.  There were even very few European stations
heard.  I worked one African and two south Americans.  Had I a three
element beam more than 30 feet high things might have been slightly
better.  I had only a ten meter sloping dipole at that point and it was
slopping south west which is the correct direction to the USA from the
UK.  I heard the SA’s and Africans as they worked the USA but I could
not hear the USA.

A week later things were better when I got up the High Sierra mobile
antenna with radials attached which I leave in England.  In the OK
Sprint RTTY Contest I was able to work Tom, KA2D on Long Island.  I made
seventy one contacts and a good many of them with my six year old grand
daughter sitting on my lap reading off the call signs and countries.
There are about five or ten US stations in that log.

After Christmas on the 31st  I ran across John, WE2F with a big signal
on 15 meter SSB and he was able to hear me and got Barry, N1EU on
frequency.  Nice to talk to some friendly ENY guys from the Albany area
with big beams.

We had a nice three-day excursion to France and Belgium before Christmas
for some shopping.  We took a car ferry across the English Channel from
Dover to Dunkirk.  It was a two and half-hour ride from Littlehampton to
Dover early in the morning to catch a nine o’clock ferry.  Sea
conditions had the ferry an hour late but the crossing was calm.  It’s
much like taking the Staten Island ferry.  You drive on and drive off
with almost no paperwork.  Passports are checked only when you are
getting on the ferry.  Once in France in was less than fifty miles to
our destination, Brugges (Brugge) in Belgium.  Brugges is a medieval
city, by passed by two world wars, with canals, horse drawn carriages,
windmills, and beautiful old stone buildings very close to the border
with Holland.   See these sites for some pictures
http://www.europebyphoto.com/brugge-tour.html
http://goeurope.about.com/od/belgiumpictures/ss/brugge_colors.htm
http://www.indiana.edu/~frithome/about/brugges-belgium.html  and
http://www.brugge.be/

As one of the travel writers points out, it’s one of the most beautiful
European cities.

While December is not the best time of year to see it, we took a lot of
pictures and enjoyed some great views and food.  Belgian beer is great,
as are the waffles and chocolate.  The only food my year old
granddaughter did not let fall to the floor during our entire month long
visit was a sweet Brugges waffle she held on to for dear life as she sat
in her stroller eating it in the town square.  Almost all the residents
speak English.  It’s their third language.  One evening we had a nice
meal in a local restaurant and met the woman who was the owner who
introduced us to her daughter and her infant granddaughter.  Very
friendly people!  My only regret is that I did not get to visit a ham
radio store that exists in the town.  I learned about it from my wife’s
cousin who has been living and working in Brussels for the past twenty
years.  Before getting back on the ferry to England we stopped at a
French “hypermarket” in Dunkirk to buy champagne, wine and cheese for a
few planned holiday parties.  A French “hypermarket” is a unique
experience.  I noticed that a worker checking wine inventory was wearing
roller skates.  That tells the story.  Hypermarkets are gigantic and
sell everything from hardware to clothing, with all sorts of food mixed
in. It’s an entire mall in one very large building. You could spend all
day wandering around and make a few stops for food and drink.  All this
enclosed on one level.  It’s great to be able to buy French wine for
under a dollar a bottle!  Needless to say we filled the nine passenger
van with goodies for the parties and New Year’s.  There is no problem
bringing any of it back to England as it’s all part of the same European
Union.

Once again I did get to visit my ham friends at the Worthing and
District ARC as I attended their Christmas Party at the British Legion
in Lancing.  Worthing is a town on the south cost of England a few miles
west of Brighton.  At their holiday event club members bring some cold
dishes and the club buys some additional food from the two pounds (a
little over 4 dollars US) collected from each attendee.  There is also a
cash bar.  Prizes are awarded for a number of internal competitions the
club holds each year such as the most DXCC countries worked in the year.
Some of these have very nice cups or plaques the winner gets to hold
for the year.  The highlight is a series of raffles – books, CW keys,
wine, and champagne, which club members, have donated.  There are loads
of prizes.  Tickets are five for a pound.  This year I was very lucky.
I took three pounds worth of tickets and won four prizes.  We kept only
two bottles of wine.  We were two very lucky Americans.

Once a month the Worthing club has a Sunday breakfast meeting at a café
on the beach just west of Worthing which brings together some
thirty-club members out of total of about 110 for about a two-hour get
together. The Worthing club is one of the larger UK clubs and like many
of the ham clubs there they meet weekly in a local church hall.  The
RSGB monthly publication “Radcom” lists club meetings for the month and
usually has a club contact person you can call for direction or more
info.  If you are planning a trip to the UK you might be interested in
attending a club meeting.

One of the highlights of this year’s trip was a visit to Bletchley Park
near Milton Keynes some fifty miles north-west of London.  If you are
planning a visit check the website at
http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/page.cfm?pageid=159  You can find
directions at
http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/page.cfm?pageid=230 Don’t use Mapquest
or you will arrive in a local industrial park as we did.  Having been a
crypto repairman in the Army Reserve a long time ago I have long been
interested in Bletchley and the story of Enigma and Ultra.  While I wish
my visit had been on a fine summer day rather than a few days after New
Year’s it was worth the journey to see where it all happened.  There is
a two hour long guided tour of the buildings and areas, which played
such an important part in World War Two codebreaking. Along the way you
will see a lot of old HRO receivers used at various British listening
sites during the war and a number of old Lorenz teleprinters plus a lot
of Enigma machines.  There are plenty to of books and souveignors in the
gift shop and there is also an Amateur radio station in the basement of
one of the buildings.  Luckily when we were there a member of the Milton
Keynes and District ARC was working on the fast scan TV set up.  He
warned me that club members were usually only there on the weekends or
as the English say, “at the weekend.”  In all we spent an interesting
four hours wandering around the historic site.

A few weeks prior to my visit I had read “The Secret Wireless War: The
story of MI6 Communications 1939-1945” by Geoffrey Pidgeon, which is
available from either ARRL or RSGB and is also on sale at Bletchley
Park. (see page 114 of March 2005 QST. I wrote this section before the
issue arrived in the mail.) The book is not about code breaking per say
but rather about the interception of the radio messages and then
transmission of the “Ultra” information or intelligence evaluation to
Allied military units in the field.  While far from a literary
masterpiece the book has many pictures and maps plus a great deal of
information about the transmission and reception of the “Ultra” story –
the radio part if you will.  Imagine my surprise when I arrived at page
thirty six and discovered that an old English RTTY friend I had worked
may times in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s on skeds and who actually
visited my house a few times during that period while on business trip
to the US, was a part of the story.  I never imagined that I would
actually know anyone involved.  But there on page thirty-six was mention
of Robin Addie who I knew as G8LT.  Apparently he was “involved in
designing some of the first aerial arrays and wireless transmitters at
Hanslop” a site some fifteen miles from Bletchley.  In the mid 1970’s
when I had last seen Robin I knew that he had been in India during the
war and was involved with secret stuff using teleprinters.  It would
still be a few years before the Officials Secrets Act would be withdrawn
from the Ultra story.  Robin could not fully answer my question.   All I
knew was that he was doing some secret stuff involving teleprinters.
What I did not know was the Robin was an MI6 Major in charge of the
“Ultra” site at Dumdum Airport in Calcutta and the commanding officer of
the author of the book.  According to the author, “I worked for him in
Calcutta where he had designed the Dum Dum relay wireless station.”
There are a few pictures of Robin in the book and a letter he wrote to
the author’s father at one point.  I discovered all this less than two
weeks before I set off for England and immediately looked up Robin on
QRZ and found that he was still listed at his old address and sent off a
letter proposing a visit as he lives only thirty miles from Bletchley.
Unfortunately the story does not have a happy ending.  When I arrived in
England my daughter had a letter for me from Robin’s wife telling me
that he had passed away eight years ago.  Apparently, the author of the
book, like me, had lost contact with Robin.  So my visit to Bletchley
was bittersweet but interesting and another example of how small ham
radio makes the world.

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN FOR 2005

It’s time to start thinking about who should get an award.  Make a
nomination, please.  Forms available at http://www.hudson.arrl.org   The
2005 Hudson Division Awards Dinner will be held November 12th in NNJ and
will be hosted by the North Jersey DX Association.

The Hudson Division will present awards to outstanding amateurs residing
in the division in 2005.  We hope many of you will make nominations and
bring a deserving Hudson Division ham to the attention of the Awards
Committee.  Forms are available (or will be shortly) on the web site at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org    Please return completed applications to
Hudson Division Vice Director Joyce Birmingham, KA2ANF by May 15. The
seven-member committee, composed of assistant
directors from each section, will announce the results in late June.

Awards will be given for the Hudson Division Amateur of the Year, Grand
Ole Ham, and Technical Achievement.  Please make a nomination for each
of these Awards.

If you have made a nomination in the past and your candidate was not
chosen, please file again as the committee does not keep a file of past
applications.

* ARRL Tells FCC to “Reconsider, Rescind and Restudy” BPL Order

(Feb 7, 2005) — The ARRL has petitioned the FCC to take its broadband
over power line (BPL) Report and Order (R&O) back to the drawing board.
In a Petition for Reconsideration filed today, the League called on the
Commission to “reconsider, rescind and restudy” its October 14, 2004,
adoption of new Part 15 rules spelling out how BPL providers may deploy
the technology on HF and low-VHF frequencies. Asserting that the R&O
fails to adequately take into account the technology’s potential to
interfere with Amateur Radio and other licensed services, the League
called the FCC’s action to permit BPL “a gross policy mistake.” The R&O,
the ARRL said, “represents a classic case of prejudgment” by an FCC that
knew better but ignored evidence already at its disposal.
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/02/08/100/?nc=1
For the full petition see
http://www.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et04-37/recon_petition/

* ARRL Board outlines ambitious legislative agenda

Frigid New England temperatures and a major snowstorm failed to chill
enthusiasm as the ARRL Board of Directors met January 21-22 in Windsor,
Connecticut, to tackle a lengthy agenda. ARRL President Jim

Haynie, W5JBP, chaired the gathering. Among the highlights of the
session was the Board’s unanimous adoption of positions on six
initiatives for the 109th Congress. The list included a call for
”consistent application” of the FCC’s limited federal preemption
policy–PRB-1–to Amateur Radio antenna systems. The League wants PRB-1
to apply to ”all types of land use regulations,” public and private.
That would include deed covenants, conditions and restrictions
(CC&Rs).

”The American Radio Relay League seeks congressional instruction to the
FCC to extend its limited preemption policy governing residential
Amateur Radio antennas, so that private land-use authorities cannot
preclude, but must reasonably accommodate, Amateur Radio communications
in subdivisions and communities,” the Board resolved. After the FCC
declined to include CCRs under the PRB-1 umbrella, the League since 2002
has initiated bills in Congress to accomplish the same end.

In addition, the Board expressed support for measures to improve federal
management of telecommunications, including beefing up the FCC’s ability
to regulate transmitter, receiver and antenna issues and resolve
electromagnetic interference. The Board also wants public service
allocations, including Amateur Radio’s, exempted from auction or
commercial reallocation, and compensatory spectrum
whenever the federal government reallocates existing public service
spectrum to another service. The resolution reflected the essence of the
”Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act of 2004,” HR 713. An
identical bill will be introduced into the 109th Congress.

Calling amateur frequencies ”the technological equivalent of a national
park,” the Board further resolved to support measures that ”preserve
and protect” primary Amateur Radio access to existing amateur spectrum
”as a natural resource for the enjoyment of all properly licensed
individuals, and protect against interference from unlicensed
transmitters such as Part 15 devices” operating on amateur
frequencies.

Finally, the Board expressed support for requiring the FCC to develop
effective, mandatory standards for radio frequency susceptibility of
consumer electronic devices. And it expressed general opposition to
expansion of current prohibitions against the reception of radio signals
beyond those already on the books.

In a related vein, the Board affirmed support for the ARRL Grassroots
Legislative Action Plan and called for its immediate implementation.
Hudson Division Director Frank Fallon, N2FF, says the Grassroots
Legislative Action Plan will function mainly by direct contacts with
lawmakers in their members’ home districts and by motivating legislative
support through letter writing by members.

Additional details on the January Board meeting are on the ARRL Web
site, www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/01/27/1/. The minutes of the Board
meeting are on the ARRL Web site,
www.arrl.org/announce/board-0501/.

* Ham won the 2005 Jeopardy “Teen Tournament”?

(Feb 9, 2005) — ARRL member Michael Braun,K3LNT! Asked what he’ll do
with his $75,000 grand prize, he replied: “Most of my money will be in
savings for college and future expenses. However, I may use a small
fraction for radio equipment.”

Having won in the semi-final round, 16-year-old Michael Braun, K3LNT, of
Silver Spring, Maryland, was among the finalists in the Jeopardy! Sony
Pictures television quiz show’s “Teen Tournament.” A high school junior,
Braun holds a General ticket, enjoys HF operating and is a member of the
Montgomery Amateur Radio Club (MARC).

> ARRL Expo 2005 to Highlight League’s National Convention in Dayton

(Jan 30, 2005) — If you’ve never been to Dayton Hamvention, then this
is the year. That’s because Hamvention will host the 2005 ARRL National
Convention May 20-22. A special feature of the event will be “ARRL Expo
2005,” a separate area at Hara Arena that will highlight what the League
means to Amateur Radio.  It’s NOT too early to start making your plans
and reservations NOW!
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/01/30/1/?nc=1  and
http://www.hamvention.org/ for details.

* Update on emergency communication Andaman &Nicobar Islands(January
5)

(Editor’s note:  In case you are not aware, a major Dxpedition lead by
Indian operators was underway from the very rare VU4 when the Tsunami
struck.  The expedition immediately switched to emergency communications
which is actually not permitted under Indian radio regulations.  Here is
a report from one of the Dxpedition participants.)

This is an update further to my last message.

The district administration Chief Car-Nicobar Isdland spoke to me this
morning to say even now it is only the ham communication that is aiding
them  for relief and rehabilitation measures and that he requested me to
retain Mr. Rama Mohan VU2MYH and other 5 hams who are in Car-Nicobar the
worst effected area.  Even the Indian Air Force base had suffered
severely and men lost in the tragic Tsunami.  Mr. Charles Harpole K4VUD
was in Port Blair, Andaman on the day of Tsunami and was residing just
adjacent room to Bharathi in the same hotel Sinclair in the 5th floor at
that time.

Bharathi in fact was in communication with many USA/Japan hams minutes
before earthquake and at the time of earthquake she was in contact with
Thailand the most affected place where lot of foreigners also died.

She could inform that there was severe earthquake before power went off.
Immediately within half hour she forced the hotel management to start
stand by supply generator and made contacts with my home as well many
Indians and foreigner t o know about happenings and the rise of sea
water minute to minute details.  Rama Mohan rushed to the chief of
administration and alerted them. This was at great risk to himself and
other members as the road in which he had to travel was also hit by
Tsunami waves later. Thus Ham could come to best rescue.  We will
acknowledge that the training he got from DERA in USA and certification
by DERA has come handy in this major natural calamity in the world. Let
every one know about it in the world please.  Thanks to Mrs. Sonia
Gandhi who helped our team to be present in the Islands since 3 rd
December came to rescue thus she is the real saviour of humanity. You
may write a letter in these words appreciating her and the role layed by
NIAR and the Dera under your leadership.  Our teams are still
sacrificing a lot and NIAR at its best in the worst of situation
providing emergency communications through Ham. Our Chief Minister of
A.P is fortunately is a friend of ours and he in turn introduced me to
Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh and made me to speak about the role
played by us in the recent Tsunami.  PM is all praise for Hams in India
and the entire world who helped us in this hour of need.  Many stories
are appearing of Ham support all over the world and that is good.  But
these stories do not say how much risk Rama Mohan and others took  and
how they are communicating from the very affected remote places. If they
are recognized properly for their work and sacrifices that is good also
for further strengthening Ham movement by NIAR/DERA together in India.
There are enough evidence with us to show in the form of e-mails
received from some foreigners in Israel/Italy etc to suggest how they
got the information of their loved ones and their safety from Rama Mohan
and others in Car-nicobar and other Islands.  Our staff member JOSE
Jacob VU2JOS is in another  remote Island hutbay and he is also doing
very well.  Only after 9 days other hams from the country could reach
Islands.  It was only NIAR and their team only was present initial 9
days.  I myself was there till 23rd and had gone to Mumbai to attend a
Ham vention and was to go back to Port Blair on 26th and Tsunami did not
help me to go there. Incidentally many news papers in Islands published
my lectures in A&N Islands to say how Hams help in disaster and how it
is useful to A&N Islands. This was between 20th &23rd December and even
Mr. Charles of USA was also present in these lectures which got
published in electronic and press media of these effected Island.  Thus
these lectures also helped administration to take immediate help from
NIAR team without further bureaucratic hurdles..  Otherwise it could
have been big miss.  I used to go on morning walk regularly while in
port blair between 6-30 to 9.0 AM on the beach as that was very
beautiful like in USA beaches. I feel that god prevented me not to
return to Port Blair as Tsunami killed so many people. In fact I tried
to go back on 25th itself and spent whole evening of 24th in Mumbai
airport to get a confirmed ticket which I could not manage.

Frustrated I returned to Hyderabad thinking I will manage for 26th a
ticket with the influence I could command from Hyderabad administration
and the airline agent.  If I had flown on 25th I could also have been
found either in dead or missing list.  My family is not able to
reconcile to this god’s grace till today.  More in next e-mail.  Very
best regards to you, your XYL and the harmonic, Suri.

National Institute of Amateur Radio,  Raj Bhavan Road, Somajiguda,
Hyderabad 500082, INDIA
Telefax: 91-40-2331 0287, E mail: niarindia@hotmail.com, Web site:
www.niar.org
Club station: VU2NRO 14160 kHz

* HOW LONG SHOULD A LICENSE COURSE BE?

See http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2005/02/01/1/?nc=1  for Dave
Sumner’s take on this issue.  Some of us have set ideas on the subject
and others of us, like me, don’t think there is only one correct
formula.  Self study, a weekly course for fifteen weeks, a weekend
course, or an eight hour marathon can all work.  We don’t all learn the
same way or at the same rate.  But the bottom line is that it frequently
takes a combination of some or all of the above to get someone through
the exam to get them on the air.  Please, let’s not be rigid about this.
A survey ARRL took a few years ago showed that many who received the
license never bothered to use it.  Now that’s a real shame.  It also
indicates the need for mentoring after one gets the license.  Those
initial radio experiences are vitally important.

While I maintain that there is no one correct answer to the question, I
am sure that we will all agree that we need more hams on the air and
operating.  We need to make sure new operators have good first
experiences as they begin, we all hope, a lifetime in ham radio.

(I feel better now that I got that off my chest!)

* SECOND ANNUAL MID ATLANTIC QSO PARTY

The (MAQP) is an old-fashioned QSO Party focusing on Delaware, Maryland,
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and DC. It
runs from Saturday May 14th 2004 at 1600 UTC until 2400 UTC Sunday May
15th 2004 with a break from 0400 – 1100 UTC Sunday. Activity will be on
all HF bands from 160 to 10 meters (except WARC bands) and 50, 144, 222,
and 440 MHz.

The MAQP seeks to provide a competitive challenge with a low-pressure
atmosphere. In short, the purpose is to have fun, enjoy the event, and
find your own desired level of participation.

The committee will offer certificates and/or plaques, including
categories such as Top Scorer in each Mid-Atlantic state, the entire
Mid-Atlantic region, each DX country, state, or VE province from which
an entry is received, and more. All stations are welcome – fixed,
mobile, rover, single or multi-operator, clubs, QRP or standard power.

Popular contest logging software modules for the MAQP are already
available, and more are coming. Information will be published on our
website as available.

Please visit the MAQP website at http://www.qsl.net/maqso for full
details, rules, maps, and all forms, available for downloading.

If you or your group or company would like to sponsor a plaque, please
contact us as soon as possible while there are still some opportunities
left!
Please contact:  Walter O’Brien/W2WJO at w2wjo@earthlink.net,  or at PO
Box 4922, Clinton, NJ 08809

—————————–

We will end this month with a little poem from a former Hudson Division
member now residing in Florida.  The poem was published a few years ago
in the NJDXA Newsletter. (thanks to NA2M for drawing our attention to it
again and we hope W2OC stays nice and warm in Florida with or without
his boxes.  We know his wife is still there so the boxes must be
gone.)

EMPTY BOXES – by Bill Fisher – W2OC

If you go down to my basement, you will stare in amazement,
At the collection of boxes you’ll see.
From ceiling to floor, empty cartons galore,
Every size, every shape there can be.

There’s one from a Kenwood that works really well,
And one from a Yaesu that I’m trying to sell.
There’s a printer, a disk drive, a monitor too,
And of course a computer, (the one called big blue).

There’s a microwave oven, and a wireless phone,
And yes, another computer, (but this one’s a clone).
Three power supplies, one electronic key,
Two VCR’s and a color TV.

There are many more boxes, the list doesn’t end,
And I better stop now, not to bore you my friend.
But they’re piling up higher and higher each day,
And to walk in my basement, well there just is no way.

Since these boxes are empty, I can hear you all shout,
Why keep them around ? Why not throw them all out ?
Well here is the fear that I live with each day,
That compels me to keep on collecting this way.

What if something should fail and be sent back for repair,
What would I do if the right box isn’t there ?
I never could handle the pain and the stress,
Of not being able to ship UPS.

But I now have the answer to this worrisome plight,
And it came from my spouse, as she told me last night,
“The solution is easy and plain as can be,
Get rid of those boxes, it’s those cartons or me”.

HAMFESTS:
++++++++++++++

* LIMARC Winter Hamfest on February 27 in Bethpage
Announcing the annual Long Island WINTER Hamfair & Electronics Show to
be held at Levittown Hall, 201 Levittown Parkway, Hicksville, NY 11801
on Sunday, February 27, 2005.

Sponsored by the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club, it features a
large indoor location.

Doors open to vendors at 8 AM and to buyers at 9 AM.

Pre-Registration is required for vendors at this indoor hamfest!
* See http://www.limarc.org/fest.htm    for more information.

5 Mar 2005 + North Jersey Hamfest
Splitrock ARA
http://www.splitrockara.org
Talk-In: 146.385/146.985 (CTCSS 131.8)
Contact: Vincent Pisano, KC2LAV
c/o Splitrock ARA
PO Box 610
Rockaway, NJ 07866
Phone: 866-457-6687
Fax: 866-457-6687
Email: hamfest@splitrockara.org

Parsippany, NJ
Parsippany PAL Building, Smith Field
Route 46 and Baldwin Road

12 Mar 2005 + Cherryville Repeater Association
http://www.qsl.net/w2cra
Talk-In: 147.975/147.375 (PL 151.4)
Contact: Walter O’Brien, W2WJO
c/o W2CRA
PO Box 308
Quakertown, NJ 08868
Phone: 908-788-4080
Email: w2cra@qsl.net

Clinton, NJ
North Hunterdon Regional High School
Route 31

10 Apr 2005 + Mt. Beacon Amateur Radio Club
http://www.qsl.net/mbarc
Talk-In: 146.97 (PL 100 or 123)
Contact: Colleen Scalia, KC2HUT
170 Shore Drive
New Windsor, NY 12553-5486
Phone: 845-497-3687
Email: kc2hut@arrl.net

Unionvale, NY
Tymor Park
County Route 21

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org

ARRL Hudson Division
February 2005
Hudson Division Beacon - e-mail edition  - # 47
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
(516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
 
Hudson Division Home Page - http://www.hudson.arrl.org
 
ARRL Members
 
Please continue to spread the word to others that may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
"Members Only" box click on "members data page" and then under email
notification options set "Division/Section notices" to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org
 
* LIMARC Winter Hamfest on February 27 in Bethpage  -  This is the first
division hamfest of the 2005 season.  Can the Spring Thaw be far
behind?
 
OOPS!!!!  We had the wrong date and number on the late January issue. 
Sorry about that!!!  The date and number should now be returned to
normal with the February issue.  
 
A few comments about our trip to England: I did bring along my trusty
Icom 706 and get on HF while there and I did manage to work a few
friends back in the Hudson Division.  But it was very few.  Conditions
were not good.  The day after we arrived was the ARRL Ten Meter contest,
one of my favorites.  There were very few stations heard and none from
the USA.  I worked a total of nine QSOs on Saturday and Sunday and did
not bother to submit a log.  There were even very few European stations
heard.  I worked one African and two south Americans.  Had I a three
element beam more than 30 feet high things might have been slightly
better.  I had only a ten meter sloping dipole at that point and it was
slopping south west which is the correct direction to the USA from the
UK.  I heard the SA's and Africans as they worked the USA but I could
not hear the USA.
 
A week later things were better when I got up the High Sierra mobile
antenna with radials attached which I leave in England.  In the OK
Sprint RTTY Contest I was able to work Tom, KA2D on Long Island.  I made
seventy one contacts and a good many of them with my six year old grand
daughter sitting on my lap reading off the call signs and countries. 
There are about five or ten US stations in that log.
 
After Christmas on the 31st  I ran across John, WE2F with a big signal
on 15 meter SSB and he was able to hear me and got Barry, N1EU on
frequency.  Nice to talk to some friendly ENY guys from the Albany area
with big beams.
 
We had a nice three-day excursion to France and Belgium before Christmas
for some shopping.  We took a car ferry across the English Channel from
Dover to Dunkirk.  It was a two and half-hour ride from Littlehampton to
Dover early in the morning to catch a nine o'clock ferry.  Sea
conditions had the ferry an hour late but the crossing was calm.  It's
much like taking the Staten Island ferry.  You drive on and drive off
with almost no paperwork.  Passports are checked only when you are
getting on the ferry.  Once in France in was less than fifty miles to
our destination, Brugges (Brugge) in Belgium.  Brugges is a medieval
city, by passed by two world wars, with canals, horse drawn carriages,
windmills, and beautiful old stone buildings very close to the border
with Holland.   See these sites for some pictures 
http://www.europebyphoto.com/brugge-tour.html
http://goeurope.about.com/od/belgiumpictures/ss/brugge_colors.htm
http://www.indiana.edu/~frithome/about/brugges-belgium.html  and
http://www.brugge.be/ 
 
As one of the travel writers points out, it's one of the most beautiful
European cities.  
 
While December is not the best time of year to see it, we took a lot of
pictures and enjoyed some great views and food.  Belgian beer is great,
as are the waffles and chocolate.  The only food my year old
granddaughter did not let fall to the floor during our entire month long
visit was a sweet Brugges waffle she held on to for dear life as she sat
in her stroller eating it in the town square.  Almost all the residents
speak English.  It's their third language.  One evening we had a nice
meal in a local restaurant and met the woman who was the owner who
introduced us to her daughter and her infant granddaughter.  Very
friendly people!  My only regret is that I did not get to visit a ham
radio store that exists in the town.  I learned about it from my wife's
cousin who has been living and working in Brussels for the past twenty
years.  Before getting back on the ferry to England we stopped at a
French "hypermarket" in Dunkirk to buy champagne, wine and cheese for a
few planned holiday parties.  A French "hypermarket" is a unique
experience.  I noticed that a worker checking wine inventory was wearing
roller skates.  That tells the story.  Hypermarkets are gigantic and
sell everything from hardware to clothing, with all sorts of food mixed
in. It's an entire mall in one very large building. You could spend all
day wandering around and make a few stops for food and drink.  All this
enclosed on one level.  It's great to be able to buy French wine for
under a dollar a bottle!  Needless to say we filled the nine passenger
van with goodies for the parties and New Year's.  There is no problem
bringing any of it back to England as it's all part of the same European
Union.
 
Once again I did get to visit my ham friends at the Worthing and
District ARC as I attended their Christmas Party at the British Legion
in Lancing.  Worthing is a town on the south cost of England a few miles
west of Brighton.  At their holiday event club members bring some cold
dishes and the club buys some additional food from the two pounds (a
little over 4 dollars US) collected from each attendee.  There is also a
cash bar.  Prizes are awarded for a number of internal competitions the
club holds each year such as the most DXCC countries worked in the year.
 Some of these have very nice cups or plaques the winner gets to hold
for the year.  The highlight is a series of raffles - books, CW keys,
wine, and champagne, which club members, have donated.  There are loads
of prizes.  Tickets are five for a pound.  This year I was very lucky. 
I took three pounds worth of tickets and won four prizes.  We kept only
two bottles of wine.  We were two very lucky Americans.
 
Once a month the Worthing club has a Sunday breakfast meeting at a café
on the beach just west of Worthing which brings together some
thirty-club members out of total of about 110 for about a two-hour get
together. The Worthing club is one of the larger UK clubs and like many
of the ham clubs there they meet weekly in a local church hall.  The
RSGB monthly publication "Radcom" lists club meetings for the month and
usually has a club contact person you can call for direction or more
info.  If you are planning a trip to the UK you might be interested in
attending a club meeting.
 
One of the highlights of this year's trip was a visit to Bletchley Park
near Milton Keynes some fifty miles north-west of London.  If you are
planning a visit check the website at 
http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/page.cfm?pageid=159  You can find
directions at 
http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/page.cfm?pageid=230 Don't use Mapquest
or you will arrive in a local industrial park as we did.  Having been a
crypto repairman in the Army Reserve a long time ago I have long been
interested in Bletchley and the story of Enigma and Ultra.  While I wish
my visit had been on a fine summer day rather than a few days after New
Year's it was worth the journey to see where it all happened.  There is
a two hour long guided tour of the buildings and areas, which played
such an important part in World War Two codebreaking. Along the way you
will see a lot of old HRO receivers used at various British listening
sites during the war and a number of old Lorenz teleprinters plus a lot
of Enigma machines.  There are plenty to of books and souveignors in the
gift shop and there is also an Amateur radio station in the basement of
one of the buildings.  Luckily when we were there a member of the Milton
Keynes and District ARC was working on the fast scan TV set up.  He
warned me that club members were usually only there on the weekends or
as the English say, "at the weekend."  In all we spent an interesting
four hours wandering around the historic site.
 
A few weeks prior to my visit I had read "The Secret Wireless War: The
story of MI6 Communications 1939-1945" by Geoffrey Pidgeon, which is
available from either ARRL or RSGB and is also on sale at Bletchley
Park. (see page 114 of March 2005 QST. I wrote this section before the
issue arrived in the mail.) The book is not about code breaking per say
but rather about the interception of the radio messages and then
transmission of the "Ultra" information or intelligence evaluation to
Allied military units in the field.  While far from a literary
masterpiece the book has many pictures and maps plus a great deal of
information about the transmission and reception of the "Ultra" story -
the radio part if you will.  Imagine my surprise when I arrived at page
thirty six and discovered that an old English RTTY friend I had worked
may times in the late 1960's and early 1970's on skeds and who actually
visited my house a few times during that period while on business trip
to the US, was a part of the story.  I never imagined that I would
actually know anyone involved.  But there on page thirty-six was mention
of Robin Addie who I knew as G8LT.  Apparently he was "involved in
designing some of the first aerial arrays and wireless transmitters at
Hanslop" a site some fifteen miles from Bletchley.  In the mid 1970's
when I had last seen Robin I knew that he had been in India during the
war and was involved with secret stuff using teleprinters.  It would
still be a few years before the Officials Secrets Act would be withdrawn
from the Ultra story.  Robin could not fully answer my question.   All I
knew was that he was doing some secret stuff involving teleprinters. 
What I did not know was the Robin was an MI6 Major in charge of the
"Ultra" site at Dumdum Airport in Calcutta and the commanding officer of
the author of the book.  According to the author, "I worked for him in
Calcutta where he had designed the Dum Dum relay wireless station."
There are a few pictures of Robin in the book and a letter he wrote to
the author's father at one point.  I discovered all this less than two
weeks before I set off for England and immediately looked up Robin on
QRZ and found that he was still listed at his old address and sent off a
letter proposing a visit as he lives only thirty miles from Bletchley. 
Unfortunately the story does not have a happy ending.  When I arrived in
England my daughter had a letter for me from Robin's wife telling me
that he had passed away eight years ago.  Apparently, the author of the
book, like me, had lost contact with Robin.  So my visit to Bletchley
was bittersweet but interesting and another example of how small ham
radio makes the world. 
 
 
* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN FOR 2005
 
It's time to start thinking about who should get an award.  Make a
nomination, please.  Forms available at http://www.hudson.arrl.org   The
2005 Hudson Division Awards Dinner will be held November 12th in NNJ and
will be hosted by the North Jersey DX Association.
 
The Hudson Division will present awards to outstanding amateurs residing
in the division in 2005.  We hope many of you will make nominations and
bring a deserving Hudson Division ham to the attention of the Awards
Committee.  Forms are available (or will be shortly) on the web site at 
http://www.hudson.arrl.org    Please return completed applications to
Hudson Division Vice Director Joyce Birmingham, KA2ANF by May 15. The
seven-member committee, composed of assistant
directors from each section, will announce the results in late June.
 
Awards will be given for the Hudson Division Amateur of the Year, Grand
Ole Ham, and Technical Achievement.  Please make a nomination for each
of these Awards. 
 
If you have made a nomination in the past and your candidate was not
chosen, please file again as the committee does not keep a file of past
applications.
 
* ARRL Tells FCC to "Reconsider, Rescind and Restudy" BPL Order 
 
(Feb 7, 2005) -- The ARRL has petitioned the FCC to take its broadband
over power line (BPL) Report and Order (R&O) back to the drawing board.
In a Petition for Reconsideration filed today, the League called on the
Commission to "reconsider, rescind and restudy" its October 14, 2004,
adoption of new Part 15 rules spelling out how BPL providers may deploy
the technology on HF and low-VHF frequencies. Asserting that the R&O
fails to adequately take into account the technology's potential to
interfere with Amateur Radio and other licensed services, the League
called the FCC's action to permit BPL "a gross policy mistake." The R&O,
the ARRL said, "represents a classic case of prejudgment" by an FCC that
knew better but ignored evidence already at its disposal.
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/02/08/100/?nc=1
For the full petition see 
http://www.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et04-37/recon_petition/
 
* ARRL Board outlines ambitious legislative agenda
 
Frigid New England temperatures and a major snowstorm failed to chill
enthusiasm as the ARRL Board of Directors met January 21-22 in Windsor,
Connecticut, to tackle a lengthy agenda. ARRL President Jim
 
Haynie, W5JBP, chaired the gathering. Among the highlights of the
session was the Board's unanimous adoption of positions on six
initiatives for the 109th Congress. The list included a call for
''consistent application'' of the FCC's limited federal preemption
policy--PRB-1--to Amateur Radio antenna systems. The League wants PRB-1
to apply to ''all types of land use regulations,'' public and private.
That would include deed covenants, conditions and restrictions
(CC&Rs).
 
''The American Radio Relay League seeks congressional instruction to the
FCC to extend its limited preemption policy governing residential
Amateur Radio antennas, so that private land-use authorities cannot
preclude, but must reasonably accommodate, Amateur Radio communications
in subdivisions and communities,'' the Board resolved. After the FCC
declined to include CCRs under the PRB-1 umbrella, the League since 2002
has initiated bills in Congress to accomplish the same end.
 
In addition, the Board expressed support for measures to improve federal
management of telecommunications, including beefing up the FCC's ability
to regulate transmitter, receiver and antenna issues and resolve
electromagnetic interference. The Board also wants public service
allocations, including Amateur Radio's, exempted from auction or
commercial reallocation, and compensatory spectrum
whenever the federal government reallocates existing public service
spectrum to another service. The resolution reflected the essence of the
''Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act of 2004,'' HR 713. An
identical bill will be introduced into the 109th Congress.
 
Calling amateur frequencies ''the technological equivalent of a national
park,'' the Board further resolved to support measures that ''preserve
and protect'' primary Amateur Radio access to existing amateur spectrum
''as a natural resource for the enjoyment of all properly licensed
individuals, and protect against interference from unlicensed
transmitters such as Part 15 devices'' operating on amateur
frequencies.
 
Finally, the Board expressed support for requiring the FCC to develop
effective, mandatory standards for radio frequency susceptibility of
consumer electronic devices. And it expressed general opposition to
expansion of current prohibitions against the reception of radio signals
beyond those already on the books.
 
In a related vein, the Board affirmed support for the ARRL Grassroots
Legislative Action Plan and called for its immediate implementation.
Hudson Division Director Frank Fallon, N2FF, says the Grassroots
Legislative Action Plan will function mainly by direct contacts with
lawmakers in their members' home districts and by motivating legislative
support through letter writing by members.
 
Additional details on the January Board meeting are on the ARRL Web
site, www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/01/27/1/. The minutes of the Board
meeting are on the ARRL Web site,
www.arrl.org/announce/board-0501/.
 
* Ham won the 2005 Jeopardy "Teen Tournament"?
 
(Feb 9, 2005) -- ARRL member Michael Braun,K3LNT! Asked what he'll do
with his $75,000 grand prize, he replied: "Most of my money will be in
savings for college and future expenses. However, I may use a small
fraction for radio equipment."
 
Having won in the semi-final round, 16-year-old Michael Braun, K3LNT, of
Silver Spring, Maryland, was among the finalists in the Jeopardy! Sony
Pictures television quiz show's "Teen Tournament." A high school junior,
Braun holds a General ticket, enjoys HF operating and is a member of the
Montgomery Amateur Radio Club (MARC). 
 
> ARRL Expo 2005 to Highlight League's National Convention in Dayton
 
 (Jan 30, 2005) -- If you've never been to Dayton Hamvention, then this
is the year. That's because Hamvention will host the 2005 ARRL National
Convention May 20-22. A special feature of the event will be "ARRL Expo
2005," a separate area at Hara Arena that will highlight what the League
means to Amateur Radio.  It's NOT too early to start making your plans
and reservations NOW!
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2005/01/30/1/?nc=1  and 
http://www.hamvention.org/ for details.
 
* Update on emergency communication Andaman &Nicobar Islands(January
5)
 
(Editor's note:  In case you are not aware, a major Dxpedition lead by
Indian operators was underway from the very rare VU4 when the Tsunami
struck.  The expedition immediately switched to emergency communications
which is actually not permitted under Indian radio regulations.  Here is
a report from one of the Dxpedition participants.)
 
   This is an update further to my last message.
 
The district administration Chief Car-Nicobar Isdland spoke to me this
morning to say even now it is only the ham communication that is aiding
them  for relief and rehabilitation measures and that he requested me to
retain Mr. Rama Mohan VU2MYH and other 5 hams who are in Car-Nicobar the
worst effected area.  Even the Indian Air Force base had suffered
severely and men lost in the tragic Tsunami.  Mr. Charles Harpole K4VUD
was in Port Blair, Andaman on the day of Tsunami and was residing just
adjacent room to Bharathi in the same hotel Sinclair in the 5th floor at
that time. 
 
Bharathi in fact was in communication with many USA/Japan hams minutes
before earthquake and at the time of earthquake she was in contact with
Thailand the most affected place where lot of foreigners also died.
 
She could inform that there was severe earthquake before power went off.
Immediately within half hour she forced the hotel management to start
stand by supply generator and made contacts with my home as well many
Indians and foreigner t o know about happenings and the rise of sea
water minute to minute details.  Rama Mohan rushed to the chief of
administration and alerted them. This was at great risk to himself and
other members as the road in which he had to travel was also hit by
Tsunami waves later. Thus Ham could come to best rescue.  We will
acknowledge that the training he got from DERA in USA and certification
by DERA has come handy in this major natural calamity in the world. Let
every one know about it in the world please.  Thanks to Mrs. Sonia
Gandhi who helped our team to be present in the Islands since 3 rd
December came to rescue thus she is the real saviour of humanity. You
may write a letter in these words appreciating her and the role layed by
NIAR and the Dera under your leadership.  Our teams are still
sacrificing a lot and NIAR at its best in the worst of situation
providing emergency communications through Ham. Our Chief Minister of
A.P is fortunately is a friend of ours and he in turn introduced me to
Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh and made me to speak about the role
played by us in the recent Tsunami.  PM is all praise for Hams in India
and the entire world who helped us in this hour of need.  Many stories
are appearing of Ham support all over the world and that is good.  But
these stories do not say how much risk Rama Mohan and others took  and
how they are communicating from the very affected remote places. If they
are recognized properly for their work and sacrifices that is good also
for further strengthening Ham movement by NIAR/DERA together in India.
There are enough evidence with us to show in the form of e-mails
received from some foreigners in Israel/Italy etc to suggest how they
got the information of their loved ones and their safety from Rama Mohan
and others in Car-nicobar and other Islands.  Our staff member JOSE
Jacob VU2JOS is in another  remote Island hutbay and he is also doing
very well.  Only after 9 days other hams from the country could reach
Islands.  It was only NIAR and their team only was present initial 9
days.  I myself was there till 23rd and had gone to Mumbai to attend a
Ham vention and was to go back to Port Blair on 26th and Tsunami did not
help me to go there. Incidentally many news papers in Islands published
my lectures in A&N Islands to say how Hams help in disaster and how it
is useful to A&N Islands. This was between 20th &23rd December and even
Mr. Charles of USA was also present in these lectures which got
published in electronic and press media of these effected Island.  Thus
these lectures also helped administration to take immediate help from
NIAR team without further bureaucratic hurdles..  Otherwise it could
have been big miss.  I used to go on morning walk regularly while in
port blair between 6-30 to 9.0 AM on the beach as that was very
beautiful like in USA beaches. I feel that god prevented me not to
return to Port Blair as Tsunami killed so many people. In fact I tried
to go back on 25th itself and spent whole evening of 24th in Mumbai
airport to get a confirmed ticket which I could not manage. 
 
Frustrated I returned to Hyderabad thinking I will manage for 26th a
ticket with the influence I could command from Hyderabad administration
and the airline agent.  If I had flown on 25th I could also have been
found either in dead or missing list.  My family is not able to
reconcile to this god's grace till today.  More in next e-mail.  Very
best regards to you, your XYL and the harmonic, Suri.
 
National Institute of Amateur Radio,  Raj Bhavan Road, Somajiguda, 
Hyderabad 500082, INDIA
Telefax: 91-40-2331 0287, E mail: niarindia@hotmail.com, Web site:
www.niar.org
Club station: VU2NRO 14160 kHz
 
* HOW LONG SHOULD A LICENSE COURSE BE?
 
See http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2005/02/01/1/?nc=1  for Dave
Sumner's take on this issue.  Some of us have set ideas on the subject
and others of us, like me, don't think there is only one correct
formula.  Self study, a weekly course for fifteen weeks, a weekend
course, or an eight hour marathon can all work.  We don't all learn the
same way or at the same rate.  But the bottom line is that it frequently
takes a combination of some or all of the above to get someone through
the exam to get them on the air.  Please, let's not be rigid about this.
 A survey ARRL took a few years ago showed that many who received the
license never bothered to use it.  Now that's a real shame.  It also
indicates the need for mentoring after one gets the license.  Those
initial radio experiences are vitally important.  
 
While I maintain that there is no one correct answer to the question, I
am sure that we will all agree that we need more hams on the air and
operating.  We need to make sure new operators have good first
experiences as they begin, we all hope, a lifetime in ham radio.
 
(I feel better now that I got that off my chest!)
 
* SECOND ANNUAL MID ATLANTIC QSO PARTY
 
The (MAQP) is an old-fashioned QSO Party focusing on Delaware, Maryland,
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and DC. It
runs from Saturday May 14th 2004 at 1600 UTC until 2400 UTC Sunday May
15th 2004 with a break from 0400 - 1100 UTC Sunday. Activity will be on
all HF bands from 160 to 10 meters (except WARC bands) and 50, 144, 222,
and 440 MHz.
 
The MAQP seeks to provide a competitive challenge with a low-pressure
atmosphere. In short, the purpose is to have fun, enjoy the event, and
find your own desired level of participation.
 
The committee will offer certificates and/or plaques, including
categories such as Top Scorer in each Mid-Atlantic state, the entire
Mid-Atlantic region, each DX country, state, or VE province from which
an entry is received, and more. All stations are welcome - fixed,
mobile, rover, single or multi-operator, clubs, QRP or standard power.
 
Popular contest logging software modules for the MAQP are already
available, and more are coming. Information will be published on our
website as available.
 
Please visit the MAQP website at http://www.qsl.net/maqso for full
details, rules, maps, and all forms, available for downloading.
 
If you or your group or company would like to sponsor a plaque, please
contact us as soon as possible while there are still some opportunities
left!
Please contact:  Walter O'Brien/W2WJO at w2wjo@earthlink.net,  or at PO
Box 4922, Clinton, NJ 08809
 
-----------------------------
 
We will end this month with a little poem from a former Hudson Division
member now residing in Florida.  The poem was published a few years ago
in the NJDXA Newsletter. (thanks to NA2M for drawing our attention to it
again and we hope W2OC stays nice and warm in Florida with or without
his boxes.  We know his wife is still there so the boxes must be
gone.)
 
EMPTY BOXES - by Bill Fisher - W2OC
 
If you go down to my basement, you will stare in amazement,
At the collection of boxes you'll see.
From ceiling to floor, empty cartons galore,
Every size, every shape there can be.
 
There's one from a Kenwood that works really well,
And one from a Yaesu that I'm trying to sell.
There's a printer, a disk drive, a monitor too,
And of course a computer, (the one called big blue).
 
There's a microwave oven, and a wireless phone,
And yes, another computer, (but this one's a clone).
Three power supplies, one electronic key,
Two VCR's and a color TV.
 
There are many more boxes, the list doesn't end,
And I better stop now, not to bore you my friend.
But they're piling up higher and higher each day,
And to walk in my basement, well there just is no way.
 
Since these boxes are empty, I can hear you all shout,
Why keep them around ? Why not throw them all out ?
Well here is the fear that I live with each day,
That compels me to keep on collecting this way.
 
What if something should fail and be sent back for repair,
What would I do if the right box isn't there ?
I never could handle the pain and the stress,
Of not being able to ship UPS.
 
But I now have the answer to this worrisome plight,
And it came from my spouse, as she told me last night,
"The solution is easy and plain as can be,
Get rid of those boxes, it's those cartons or me".
 
HAMFESTS: 
++++++++++++++
 
* LIMARC Winter Hamfest on February 27 in Bethpage 
Announcing the annual Long Island WINTER Hamfair & Electronics Show to
be held at Levittown Hall, 201 Levittown Parkway, Hicksville, NY 11801
on Sunday, February 27, 2005. 
 
Sponsored by the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club, it features a
large indoor location.
 
Doors open to vendors at 8 AM and to buyers at 9 AM. 
 
Pre-Registration is required for vendors at this indoor hamfest! 
* See http://www.limarc.org/fest.htm    for more information. 
 
 
5 Mar 2005 + North Jersey Hamfest
Splitrock ARA
http://www.splitrockara.org
Talk-In: 146.385/146.985 (CTCSS 131.8)
Contact: Vincent Pisano, KC2LAV
c/o Splitrock ARA 
PO Box 610 
Rockaway, NJ 07866
Phone: 866-457-6687 
Fax: 866-457-6687
Email: hamfest@splitrockara.org
 
Parsippany, NJ
Parsippany PAL Building, Smith Field
Route 46 and Baldwin Road
 
12 Mar 2005 + Cherryville Repeater Association
http://www.qsl.net/w2cra
Talk-In: 147.975/147.375 (PL 151.4)
Contact: Walter O'Brien, W2WJO
c/o W2CRA 
PO Box 308 
Quakertown, NJ 08868 
Phone: 908-788-4080 
Email: w2cra@qsl.net 
 
Clinton, NJ
North Hunterdon Regional High School
Route 31
 
10 Apr 2005 + Mt. Beacon Amateur Radio Club
http://www.qsl.net/mbarc
Talk-In: 146.97 (PL 100 or 123)
Contact: Colleen Scalia, KC2HUT
170 Shore Drive 
New Windsor, NY 12553-5486
Phone: 845-497-3687 
Email: kc2hut@arrl.net
 
Unionvale, NY
Tymor Park
County Route 21
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org

Hudson Division Beacon – January 2004

ARRL Hudson Division
January 2004
Hudson Division Beacon - e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
(516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org

Hudson Division Home Page - http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
"Members Only" box click on "members data page" and then under email
notification options set "Division/Section notices" to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

* BEST WISHES for 2004

My wife Kathleen and I returned from England on January 6th after a
three and half week visit over Christmas and the New Year with the
family. I did manage to get on the air as M/N2FF in both the ARRL Ten
Meter Contest and the ARRL RTTY Roundup and work a few of you in those
contests.  My wife and I attended a holiday party the Worthing and
District ARC held and had a great time. We also managed a one-day ferry
trip to Calais, France for some pre Christmas shopping - great prices on
French wine and champagne.  Back in the US on January 6th and a bit sad
after saying goodbye to granddaughters Georgia and Delilah.

Meanwhile we await the Spring Thaw and the first February Hamfest.  See
the listing at the end for a cure to cabin fever.

* ARRL BOARD MEETING REPORT

It was my pleasure to introduce new Hudson Division Vice Director, Joyce
Birmingham, KA2ANF, to the ARRL Board at the January 2004 meeting. 
Joyce was a real hit with the board from Jim Haynie as well as other
members of the ARRL Board family. 

There were a number of big decisions made at the meeting:

A membership contact campaign to alert senators and congressmen about
BPL starting in March.  You will be asked to contact your congressional
representatives.  Stay tuned.

The ARRL Board of Directors approved the development of a four-level set
of Amateur Radio mentoring programs to help new licensees and those
seeking to expand their horizons and get more out of Amateur Radio.  See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/01/22/2/?nc=1 

ARRL Board of Directors in a historic move overwhelmingly approved a
three class Amateur Radio license plan during its Annual Meeting in
Windsor, Connecticut. The proposals--developed by the ARRL Executive
Committee following a Board instruction last July--are in response to
changes made in Article 25 of the international Radio Regulations at
World Radiocommunication Conference 2003 (WRC-03).  The ARRL plan will
ask the FCC to create a new entry-level Amateur Radio license that would
include HF phone privileges without requiring a Morse code test. The
League also will propose consolidating all current licensees into three
classes, retaining the Element 1 Morse requirement--now 5 WPM--only for
the Extra class license.
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/01/19/1/?nc=1  and
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/01/28/100/?nc=1 for details.

This is the ARRL Board reaction to deletion of the Morse requirement for
HF operation in the ITU treaty language.  I support the plan as I see it
as the only possible way to continue our Morse code tradition.  It is
widely believed that the FCC wants to eliminate the Morse requirement
entirely for all licenses.  I view this plan as the only hope that there
will be Morse testing at any level.  Some of the other plans already
offered to the FCC have no chance, in my mind, of being adopted as
public policy by the government agency. I feel other plans seeking to
"increase the code speed" have absolutely no chance of acceptance by the
FCC.  

Yes, it was obvious from the survey I sent out last September that the
majority of members in the Hudson Division wanted to continue CW testing
requirements but they also wanted an entrance level license that allowed
HF access with no CW or minimum CW knowledge.  I view the plan developed
by the ARRL EC as the only chance of preserving our Morse testing
tradition at any level.  Looking at what has already happened in Europe
and Australia I can see the handwriting on the wall in the FCC office.

Yes, this is a very emotional, almost religious issue, for many hams. 
The directors realized full well that not all ARRL members were going to
be happy with the decision.  There is no way to keep all our members
happy over this issue.  I have thought long and hard about this issue
for the last seven years and feel we are taking the wrong path in
attempting to continue to force Morse code on those entering our great
hobby.  It has not worked.  While I will continue for many years, God
willing, to work CW DX and enter CW contests, I no longer see any wisdom
in forcing those entering our ranks to take a CW test. It is certainly
not going to help us grow the ranks of Amateur Radio.  I am interested
in doing just that.  

Please note the issue here is CW testing and not CW sub-bands. 

Those who want us to dig our heels in here and fight for higher code
speed testing and CW testing at all levels are failing to take into
consideration what the FCC told us back in 2000, when it lowered the
code speed to 5 WPM.  At that point the FCC said the sole reason they
were keeping the test, at all, was because of international treaty
requirements.  Those requirements were dropped on July 4th 2003 and no
longer exist.  In the FCC's mind there is no longer a reason to give a
Morse test.  We, ARRL, hope to be able to give them a number of reasons
to keep the test for the Extra Class license thus preserving the
tradition.  We hope therefore that the great majority of you will
support the ARRL proposal and let the FCC know that during the comment
period.

When the FCC assigns a number to the petition you will have a chance to
make your feelings known to the FCC.  Both Joyce and I realize that
there are many of you are not happy with the ARRL position.  When the
process is over, probably some time before May 2005, it will be the FCC
that decides the issue for us all.

* HRU 2004 A SUCCESS DESPITE BAD WEATHER

HRU 2004 was another success.  Held on Sunday, January 18, 2004 at
Oyster Bay, New York and sponsored by Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio
Club; the event was a success despite a snowstorm. Local clubs had
exhibits and there were many forums.  The ARES forum and Ed Hare's BPL
forum had big crowds.  There were also some nice prizes given out at the
end of the event.  Well done all who worked to make the event a success
in the NLI Section!

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS DINNER EARNS $1070 for BPL EFFORT

The 10-70 Repeater Association, Inc.  presented  Mary Hobart, K1MMH,
Chief Development Officer of the ARRL with a check for $1070.00 on
January 15, 2004. This check represents a donation by the repeater club
and monies raised during the Hudson Division Awards Dinner, where 10-70
was the host club.

The presentation was made at the ARRL Board of Directors meeting in
Hartford, CT by ARRL Hudson Division Vice Director, Joyce Birmingham,
KA2ANF; who also serves as 10-70's Vice President, and ARRL Hudson
Division Director Frank Fallon, N2FF. This donation will go to the ARRL
Spectrum Defense Fund to support the fight against BPL.

A BIG thanks to the 10-70 Repeater Association, the host club for the
event, for their efforts and to all who took ads, attended and made
contributions at the event thereby making it successful on all levels.

* HUDSON DIVISION CABINET AND PRESIDENTS MEETING SET FOR FEBRUAY 7th

Saturday February 7th there will be a joint Hudson Division Cabinet and
Club Presidents Meeting starting at 9:30 at the Paramus Congregational
Church.   Bagels and coffee will be served  at 9 AM.  Assistant
Directors and Club Presidents or their representatives are invited to
attend.  Please let Joyce Birmingham, KA2ANF, Hudson Division Vice
Director know you are coming.  Send e-mail to:  ka2anf @arrl.org 

Coffee and bagels will be provided and I plan to start the meeting
promptly at 9:30.  We will provide pizza for lunch. The meeting will end
by 2 PM.  Please bring your ideas and input.  If you have any items for
the agenda please send me an e-mail at n2f@arl.org

All division affiliated clubs should send a representative if the
president is unable to attend.

Paramus Congregational Church
Entrance is the basement on the side of  the church.
205 Spring Valley RoadParamus, NJ 07652

1)  From New York City  GWB to NJ.  Take Route 4 West to the Paramus
area. Exit at the Spring Valley Road Exit (go right, toward
Oradell/River Edge).  Go through the light and the church is the second
one on the left almost across from the Middle school. Entrance is the
basement on side of the church.

2) From Route 17 North and South, Take the Century Road Exit and go East
toward River Edge.  Go up hill thru light, down hill to next light and
turn Left. Paramus High School is on your left.  Go to second church on
the left.  

* FAR SCHOLARSHIPS ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE FOUNDATION FOR AMATEUR RADIO, INC., a non-profit organization with
headquarters in Washington, D.C., plans to administer fifty-nine (59)
scholarships for the academic year 2004 - 2005 to assist licensed Radio
Amateurs. The Foundation, composed of over seventy-five local area
Amateur

Radio Clubs, fully funds seven of these scholarships with the income
from grants and its annual Hamfest. The remaining fifty-two (52) are
administered by the Foundation without cost to the various donors.

Licensed Radio Amateurs may compete for these awards if they plan to
pursue a full-time course of studies beyond high school and are enrolled
in or have been accepted for enrollment at an accredited university,

college or technical school. The awards range from $500 to $2500 with
preference given in some cases to residents of specified geographical
areas or the pursuit of certain study programs. Clubs, especially those
in Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and
Wisconsin, are encouraged to announce these opportunities at their
meetings, in their club newsletters, during training classes, on their
nets and on their world wide web home pages.

Additional information and an application form may be requested by
letter or QSL card, postmarked prior to April 30, 2004 from: 

FAR Scholarships
Post Office Box 831
Riverdale, MD 20738

The Foundation for Amateur Radio, incorporated in the District of
Columbia, is an exempt organization under Section 501(C)(3) of the
Internal Revenue Code of 1954. It is devoted exclusively to promoting
the interests of Amateur Radio and those scientific, literary and
educational pursuits that advance the purposes of the Amateur Radio
Service. 

* The Big Project's Ranks, Enthusiasm Expand

(Jan 27, 2004) -- Since coming onboard as ARRL Amateur Radio Education
and Technology Program Coordinator some six months ago, Mark Spencer,
WA8SME, has seen the number of "Big Project" pilot schools rise from 50
to 70. Fourteen schools came aboard last fall, while another three
schools already in the program received progress grants of up to $500 to
help them continue their Big Project activities.

http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/01/27/2/?nc=1

* DXCC DEADLINES

Just a reminder that the deadline to be shown in the next DXCC Honor
Roll list is March 31, 2004. 

Submissions must be postmarked March 31, 2004 for your submission to
count for this listing. 

The DXCC Honor Roll list will appear in August 2004 QST. 

There are 335 entities on the DXCC list and you must be within the
numerical top 10 DXCC entities to qualify. The current minimum
requirement for Honor Roll is 326 current entities.

de Angel M Garcia - WA2VUY DXAC Member, Hudson Division
* SIX METER MILLENNIUM NET

The 6 Meter Millennium Net is moving from its usual spot, Friday 9:30 PM
local time 50.135 Mhz to Wednesday 9:00 PM, 50.135 Mhz.  This change
becomes effective 1/14/04
http://www.qsl.net/w2rjj/6meter/welcome6.htm

The net is now all USB, the cw portion has stopped since all the
participants passed the code exam and we spend our cw operating time on
HF.  De Dave White KC2ICA

* RARITAN BAY RADIO AMATEURS CELEBRATE FIFTIETH YEAR

Just wanted to mention that our radio club, the Raritan Bay Radio
Amateurs, Inc. (RBRA) will be celebrating our 50th anniversary in 2004.
We were founded in 1954 and our original club call was K2OML, but this
was quickly changed to K2GE in 1956 when one of our original members
became a silent key. 

The RBRA currently has 53 members, we have monthly meetings, alternating
between "on-the-air" and face-to-face meetings, dinners, and pizza
parties. We're a general purpose radio club (Field Day, VHF/UHF
Contests, VE Testing, etc.) and we're also an ARRL Special Service Club
(SSC). Our K2GE VHF/UHF repeater has been on the air for over 30 years -
it has multiple repeater sites with outputs on 146.76 MHz. and 443.200
MHz. In addition, we have VHF/UHF packet repeaters and are also active
on APRS.

Walt Kapica WA2NXK 
RBRA Club Treasurer 

* METROPLEX ELECTS 2004 OFFICERS

The Metroplex Amateur Radio Club, serving the New York City Metropolitan
Area, has elected its officers for 2004. Tom Bennett, N2IMG, will
continue his second term as the group's president; John Acovino, KB2VVO,
has been elected vice-president, Armand Lucchesi, WA2SHA, the club's
trustee, will serve as secretary-treasurer.

M.A.R.C. directors for this year include: Acovino; Dominic Benjamin,
AB2BW; Bennett; Nick Bernice, W2NAB; Frank Ferrer, KB2VVP; George
Lafasakis, N2ROI; Walter Lange, WA2BHU; Lucchesi; John Ludewig, KB2VJM;
and Paul Lynch, KB2WEE.

The Office of Emergency Management Team is headed by Michael Adams,
WA2MWT, OEM Coordinator and Public and Government Relations Director. He
is assisted by John Ludewig, Bruce Greenwood, KB2UJN; Steve Goeller,
K2BTP; Marc Monda, N2ZNP and Jon Burchfield, NJ2N. Matt Alfano, W2NIW,
is chairman of the Membership Committee.

"After two years of re-building, we have recently surpassed our goal of
fifty members," President Bennett commented, "We offer weekly technical
support sessions, a VE team, and public service and public safety
participation through Emergency Management and the National Weather
Service's SkyWarn program."

The Metroplex Amateur Radio Club, operating as W2MPX, operates on
145.450, -.600KHz, with a PL of 100.0 Hz. The group meets at the Red Oak
Diner, in Fort Lee, NJ, every Saturday from 1:00 - 5:00 PM. The website
is www.metroplex.org     Submitted by Michael Adams, WA2MWT
Wa2mwt@arrl.net

* DIANA DAY in WALL, NJ

The OCEAN/MONMOUTH ARC (OMARC) had a special event called Diana Day, at
the Diana site of Camp Evans in Wall, NJ on Saturday, Jan 10th.  The
event commemorated the 58th anniversary of project Diana which initially
took place on Jan 10, 1946.   Project Diana was the first time that
radar signals were sent to the moon and successfully received back on
earth. This historic event opened the way to space communications as we
know it today and proved that the ionosphere could be penetrated in both
directions with little attenuation. For more info on project Diana go to
www.infoage .org 

There were fifteen OMARC members in attendance and the event was opened
to the public. Communications was made on HF with 65 amateurs throughout
the U.S. and commemorative QSL certificates are being sent to the
stations that requested them. 

73/ RON OLENDER/ WA2HZT  PRESIDENT OMARC

* HAVING  A HOOT !

The Owls were active in this month's NA QSO Party CW
Members of the Order of Boiled Owls were active in this weekend's NA QSO
Party CW. The NAQP began Saturday, January 10, at 1 PM (EST) and ran for
12 hours. The following callsigns were active: KW2O (operated by Dennis
K2SX), W2OWL (operated by Frank N2FF), NA2M (Bill), W2YK (Frank) and
N2GA (George). Some of these members will used the name "HOOT" in
celebration of the Owl's 50th year. Contact with any of these stations
will count towards the Owls' "OBO 50 Award". See http://www.obony.org
for more information.  (de George Tranos N2GA)

* Announcing The First Annual Mid-Atlantic QSO Party

We're pleased to announce the first annual MID-ATLANTIC QSO PARTY. It's
a good old fashioned QSO Party, focused on Delaware, Maryland, New
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the District
Of Columbia. It will run from May 8th 2004 at 1600 UTC until May 9th
2004 at 2400 UTC on all HF bands except WARC, and on VHF/UHF from 50 to
450 MHz. 

The MAQP seeks to provide a competitive challenge with a low-pressure
atmosphere. In short, the purpose is to have fun, enjoy the event, and
find your own desired level of participation.

The MAQP committee will offer certificates and plaques, including
categories such as Top Scorer in each Mid-Atlantic state, the entire
Mid-Atlantic region, each DX country, state, or VE province from which
an entry is received, and more. All stations are welcome - fixed,
mobile, rover, single or multi-operator, clubs, QRP or standard power.

Contest logging software designers are already preparing MAQP modules.
Information will be published on our website as available.  Please visit
the MAQP website at http://www.qsl.net/maqso for full details, rules,
maps, and all forms, available for downloading, as well as a current
list of plaques and awards.

In New Jersey, please contact:

Walter O'Brien/W2WJO at w2wjo@earthlink.net and Mike Clarson/WV2ZOW at
mclarson@rcc.com

 >>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS: 

The Division's first hamfest of 2004 is:

29 Feb 2004 + Long Island Mobile ARC
http://www.limarc.org/fest.htm 
Contact:
Diane Ortiz, K2DO 
PO Box 392
Levittown, NY 11756
Phone: 631-286-7562 
Email: hamfest@limarc.org
Hicksville, NY  
Sect: New York City-Long Island

6 Mar 2004 x Splitrock ARA
http://www.splitrockara.org
Contact:
Michael Greenfeld, K8BQ
PO Box 610
Rockaway, NJ 07866
Phone: 866-457-6687 
Email: hamfest@splitrockara.org
Parsippany, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey 

13 Mar 2004 + Cherryville Repeater Association  
http://www.qsl.net/w2cra
Contact:
Cherryville Repeater Assocation, W2CRA
PO Box 308
Quakertown, NJ 08868
Phone: 908-788-4080 
Email: w2cra@qsl.net
Clinton, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey 

14 Mar 2004 + Orange County ARC  
http://www.bestweb.net/~ocarc/  
Contact:
Ed Moskowitz, N2XJI
123 Harold Avenue
Cornwall, NY 12518
Phone: 845-534-3492 
Email: n2xji@arrl.net
New Windsor, NY
Sect: Eastern New York
--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org

Hudson Division Beacon – December 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
December 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

* BEST WISHES
The BEST of Holiday wishes to all.

My wife Kathleen and I are off to England for Christmas and the New Year
with the family. Please look for M/N2FF in both the ARRL Ten Meter
Contest and the ARRL RTTY Roundup.

Our BIG news here is the arrival of a second grandchild – Delilah Violet
at 7 lbs. 14 oz born November 6th at Chichester, England.  Mother and
child both doing very well and home less than twelve hours after the
event.  The grandparents are already practicing their coos.

* N2FF REELECTED IN HUDSON DIVISION BY NEARLY 500 VOTE MARGIN –
You did send the ballot back, didn’t you?

Well, some 48.96 % of division members did return their ballots and
Frank Fallon N2FF was reelected as ARRL Hudson Division Director!
Incumbent Director Frank Fallon, N2FF, of East Williston, New York,
defeated his current Vice Director and former Director Stephen A.
Mendelsohn, W2ML, of Dumont, New Jersey, in the recently concluded
election. See full story at
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/11/21/3/?nc=1

Ballots were counted on Friday, November 21st at HQ.  Participation was
only three tenths of a percent greater than a division election held
three years ago in 2000 for vice director.

* HUDSON DIVISION CABINET AND PRESIDENTS MEETING SET FOR FEBRUAY 7th

Saturday February 7th there will be a joint Hudson Division Cabinet and
Club Presidents Meeting starting at 9:30 at the at the Paramus
Congregational Church.   Bagels and coffee will be served at at 9 AM.
Assistant Directors and Club Presidents or their representatives are
invited to attend.  Please let Joyce Birmingham, KA2ANF, Hudson Division
Vice Director know you are coming.  Send e-mail to:  ka2anf@arrl.org

Coffee and bagels will be provided and I plan to start the meeting
promptly at 9:30.  We will provide pizza for lunch. The meeting will end
by 2 PM.  Please bring your ideas and input.  If you have any items for
the agenda please send me an e-mail at n2ff@arl.org

All division affiliated clubs should send a representative if the
president is unable to attend.

Paramus Congregational Church
Entrance is the basement on the side of  the church.
205 Spring Valley Road, Paramus, NJ 07652

1)  From New York City  GWB to NJ.  Take Route 4 West to the Paramus
area. Exit at the Spring Valley Road Exit (go right, toward
Oradell/River Edge).  Go through the light and the church is the second
one on the left almost across from the Middle school. Entrance is the
basement on side of the church.

2) From Route 17 North and South, Take the Century Road Exit and go East
toward River Edge.  Go up hill thru light, down hill to next light and
turn Left. Paramus High School is on your left.  Go to second church on
the left.

* FEMA’s CHRISTMAS PRESENT TO ARRL’s BPL EFFORT

FEMA to FCC: BPL will “Severely Impair” Mission-Essential HF Operations

Dec 8, 2003) — Expressing “grave concerns” about likely interference
from unlicensed Broadband over Power Line (BPL) systems, the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has told the FCC that BPL could
“severely impair FEMA’s mission-essential HF radio operations in areas
serviced by BPL technology.” FEMA filed comments December 4 in response
to last April’s FCC BPL Notice of Inquiry, ET Docket 03-104. FEMA
expressed primary concern over BPL’s potential impact on the FEMA
National Radio System (FNARS), which operates on HF and serves as the
agency’s primary command and control backup medium as part of the
Federal Response Plan.

See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/12/08/1/?nc=1

==>LOGBOOK OF THE WORLD CONTINUES TO GROW

The ARRL’s Logbook of the World secure contact-verification database
continues to grow. So far, reports ARRL Membership Services Manager
Wayne Mills, N7NG, nearly 5000 users have uploaded logs containing some
25.4 million Amateur Radio contacts. This has resulted in more than 1
million QSL records.

“The key is participation, and it doesn’t cost a thing to get the
software and upload logs,” Mills pointed out. “We’re encouraging all
hams to participate in Logbook, whether the ham is a casual operator,
contester, ragchewer or DXer.” To further expand the database and
generate more confirmed contacts for all LoTW users, Mills is calling on
everyone to sign aboard and submit as many logs as possible.

Once LoTW programming is complete, users will be able to redeem credits
for ARRL awards without having to go through the expense and trouble of
obtaining hard-copy QSL cards. Mills emphasizes that LoTW is not meant
to replace paper QSL cards but supplements traditional QSLing.

Signing up as a new LoTW user is simple. Visit the Logbook of The World
Web site <http://www.arrl.org/lotw> and read the “Getting Started”
document, Mills said. He advises new users to print it out to have the
instructions handy.

The “Getting Started” page offers step-by-step instructions for getting
a secure digital certificate from ARRL and preparing and uploading logs.
Mills noted that most new user problems result from failing to
specifically follow the instructions outlined on the “Getting Started”
page.

Amateur Radio software developers are starting to include direct support
for Logbook of The World in their programs. Most logging software allow
users to export a log in ADIF format, which LoTW will accept. A few
programs incorporate the ARRL’s TQSL file-generation and digital
certificate code, which simplifies the process of digitally signing logs
and exporting them in a separate e-mail.

For more information, visit the Logbook of The World Web site
<http://www.arrl.org/lotw>.(de The ARRL Letter, Vol. 22, No. 48, December 5, 2003)

* International Morse Code Gets a New ITU Home, New Character

(Dec 10, 2003) — The 2003 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-03)
may have eliminated the treaty requirement for prospective amateurs to
demonstrate Morse code proficiency to gain HF access,but the
International Telecommunication Union (ITU) hasn’t forgotten Morse code
altogether. In Geneva on December 5, the ITU Radiocommunication Sector
(ITU-R) Study Group 8 agreed on the wording of a Draft New
Recommendation ITU-R M.[MORSE] that specifies the international Morse
code character set and transmission procedures. It also includes a new
Morse code character to cover the “@” symbol used in e-mail addresses.
See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/12/10/2/?nc=1 for more
details.

To keep up with the times, however, the IARU proposed adding a new
character–the commercial “at” or @ symbol-to permit sending e-mail
addresses in Morse code. The draft new recommendation proposes using the
letters A and C run together (.–.-.) to represent the @ symbol.

>  GOOD NEWS IN RIVERHEAD

Section hams come through at Riverhead Town Variance Hearing

On Thursday, November 13, 5 hams from the NLI section testified at the
variance hearing of Sal Console in the town of Riverhead, Long Island,
NY. Mr. Console, also known as “Ted” holds the callsign K2QMF and has
been a ham since 1956. He moved to Riverhead in May, 2003, and submitted
plans for a 70 foot crank-up tower. Norm Wesler, K2YEW, a professional
engineer in NY state, testified on the need for the height. Richard
Knadle, K2RIW testified about RF emission and safety. Howard Liebman
,W2QUV testified about television and telephone interference. George
Tranos, N2GA testified on the value of Amateur Radio. Frank Fallon N2FF
was on hand to testify about the national organization for Amateur
Radio, the ARRL. The town board, in an unusual decision, decided to
issue a variance that night and included Mr. Console’s tower under the
town’s existing 50 foot Amateur Radio exemption. The town issued the
variance with the proviso that the tower can only be cranked up above 50
foot for 1500 hours a year. Congratulations to K2QMF and to the entire
team!

Comment:  We spent about fifteen minutes in a sidebar with the town
attorney over the issue of how often the tower would be at heights above
fifty feet.  We were told that the town wanted to grant the permit for
the structure but wanted to show the neighbors that the town did still
have some control over the heights.  At first they suggested a schedule
for hours per week which we felt would allow some neighbor to bring the
ham back to the zoning board.  The town finally agreed to the year
formula.  We don’t believe anyone is going to be keeping a log of the
hours the tower is above 50 feet.  The provision is actually
unenforcable.

* HOW BIG DO YOU WANT YOUR TOWER TO BE?

Perhaps you have seen pictures of this monster 80 meter beam on a
massive tower in Japan?  A number of people sent me the url and I found
it hard to believe.  Quite frankly I thought it was trick photography.
How often do you see someone walking on the boom of a beam and look so
small in comparison?

Assistant Director Herb Sweet sent the following e-mail:

Frank,

The monster ant looks legitimate. The owner is well known and this is
the third person that has confirmed the antenna to me. K2JMY, a local
avid 75 meter DXer told me that this ham previously had a 3 element beam
on 75 meters but that wasn’t good enough for him!

Herbie

——– Original Message ——–

Subject:

Remote Access by SSH.

Date:

Thu, 20 Nov 2003 19:26:37 +0900

From:

Hisao Okumura <Y15997@jp.ibm.com>

To:

k2gbh@arrl.net

Of course I saw your mail about big monster.

7J4AAL made a road to build a 75m/80m full size 5 ele Yagi on the
hill near the hospital.

He is a director of the hospital.

http://www.nn.iij4u.or.jp/~mak-oxv/

JG3IWL
Hisao Okumura,

* NNJ SM Hudzik PULLS OFF Coup IN NEW JERSEY

At the League of Municipalities Convention on November 18 at Atlantic
City a group of NJ hams made a presentation to local government
officials.  The Emergency Communications Workshop came off with much
success! Of the four presenters three were hams: W2UDT, NNJ SM, K2SO,
NNJ SEC, and N2HX (from the State Police OEM Office). There were over 70
attendees for the workshop and passed out some thirty Cronkite videos as
well as some fifty ARES brochures to the various elected officials
there.  Both Steve, K2SO and Bill, W2UD spent some time answering
questions even after the session was over. Looks like we scored a very
positive media hit!

The moderator, Parsippany Mayor Marceil Letts, contributed accolades, as
well, from her experience with amateur radio volunteers. K2SO’s power
point presentation, which led off with the Cronkite video, equalled the
professional State Police one!

* ATTENTION CLUBS  –  Worthing club raises over £2000 for Children in
Need

When I visit England the local amateur radio club there is the Worthing
club just a few miles from Brighton.  I usually try to get to a club
meeting or an event they are having.  It’s great to see how hams are
doing in another country or meet someone you have worked.  Last year at
Dayton I ran into a member of the Worthing club I had met the previous
December in England.

While browsing the RSGB members only site I found the following item
about the club.  Now, while you may never get to England, perhaps you
will find a gem of an idea here.  It appears the Worthing club managed
to kill two birds at once and get some great PR for amateur radio in the
process:

On Friday and Saturday the 21st and 22nd of November, members of the
Worthing and District Amateur Radio Club operated a Special Event
Station to raise money for the BBC “Children In Need” appeal. GB2KIN was
located in the foyer of the Holmbush Shopping Centre, Shoreham, in West
Sussex, where members of the public watched the operators in action on
40 metres CW and phone. The station was organised by Chris Delhaye,
G3NDJ. Two Pudsey bears )probably some time of stuffed bear) were
raffled, one on each day, to raise even more money and the total raised
was over  £2300.   (That’s about $3,675 US)
http://www.wadarc.org.uk/

* BOILED OWLS AWARD AVAILABLE IN 2004

The Order of Boiled Owls of New York, established in 1954 and dedicated
to Amateur Radio HF contesting and DX’ing, invites Radio Amateurs
worldwide to join the celebration of our Golden Anniversary in 2004 by
“Working The Owls” to obtain a handsome certificate for the  “OBO 50
Award”. See http://reallybig.com/obo/  for a picture of the award.

Eligibility:All government-licensed Radio Amateurs worldwide
Bands: All amateur frequencies below 54 MHz.
Modes: Any Mode – No band or mode categories or endorsements

To qualify: Accumulate a total of five “contact credits” by working
members of the OBO and/or the OBO’s club stations during calendar year
2004 as follows:

Two “contact credits” for QSO’s with club stations: KW2O W2OWL
One “contact credit” for QSO’s with club members (listed below).
Each callsign may be worked only once.
DX portable operations by these stations count as separate callsigns.
An endorsement is offered for accumulating ten “contact credits”
Award Period: All contacts must be made between 0000Z, 1 January
2004 and 2359Z, 31 December 2004. To receive an award certificate – Mail contact logs (no
QSL’s required) to:
Dennis McAlpine – K2SX
Secretary, Order of Boiled Owls of New York
12 Ridgecrest East
Scarsdale, NY 10583 USA

Enclose $3.00 (U.S.) or 4 IRCs to cover certificate and mailing
costs.

Award applications must be received by March 31, 2005
Questions?  E-mail: K2SX@arrl.net

Current Members (1 point each): N2GA  K2AW  W2AX  N2FF  K2DO
W2LK  N2QW  K2LE  W2YK  N2UN K2SX WM2V  NA2M  KS2G

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:  There are none.  The next event will be:

HRU 2004 on Sunday, January 18, 2004 at Oyster Bay, New York Sponsored
by Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club.  The event will be held at the
East Woods School located at 31 Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, NY

Although NOT a hamfest, this is a very worthwhile event being held for
the fourth year. Plan to be there.

You will meet a lot of hams and learn a thing or two at the forums.
Local clubs will be on hand showing off their activities and the price
is right at $2.00.

Directions: (The school is approximately 18 miles east of the
Queens/Nassau border in Nassau County)

Take the Long Island Expressway east to Exit 41 North (Rte 106/107). 106
and 107 will split about 1/2 mile north of the LIE, follow 106 north (to
the right). Go about 4 miles to Route 25A. Make a right and head east on
25A and go about 2 miles to Yellow Cote Road (on your left). Look for
the white sign which says “East Woods School”. Go another 1/2 mile and
the entrance to the school will be on your left at another white sign.
Go up the hill and park in one of the three designated parking areas.
Look for the HRU signs!

Special Features of Event: Ham Radio University 2004, forums on all
aspects of Amateur Radio, Special Event Station.  Exams being given:
ARRL Sponsored Exams

Talk-In Frequency: W2VL 146.850 -600 136.5 PL   Web URL:
http://www.hudson.org/nli/hru2004

THE BEST IN 2004!!!!!!!

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————

Hudson Division Beacon – November 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
November 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org/

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org/

Best Thanksgiving Wishes to one and all.  Have a good weekend with the
family and perhaps you can find time to sneak away that weekend to get
in some time with the CQWW CW Contest.  Ten meters may again be open.

Our BIG news here is the arrival of a second grandchild – Delilah Violet
at 7 lbs. 14 oz born November 6th at Chichester, England.  Mother and
child both doing very well and home less than twelve hours after the
event.  The grandparents are already practicing their coos.

* DIRECTOR ELECTIONS IN HUDSON DIVISION  – You did sent the ballot back,
didn’t you?

Ballots will be counted on Friday, November 21st at HQ and must be
received by noon that day.  We should all see the results posted some
time before 3 PM that day on the ARRL web site.

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS DINNER November 8th in Paramus

Over 100 local hams, friends and family were on hand to honor the Hudson
Division Awardees on November 8th.  The exact number was 112.
Originator of the event, Hudson Division Director, Frank Fallon, N2FF
called the event, “The Fourth Annual Awards Dinner and our most
successful so far. We had twenty more people than we had last year.”  At
the end of the evening Paul Beshlian, KC2CJW, President of 10-70
Repeater Association and  Master of Ceremonies for the evening
speculated that the club would be writing a check for nearly $1,000 to
the ARRL Spectrum Defense Fund.  ARRL’s Chief Development Officer, Mary
Hobart, W1MMH was on hand to thank everyone for the donation from the
successful event.

Earlier in the evening Ed Hare, W1RFI, ARRL’s Laboratory Manager gave a
brief talk and showed a video about BPL and answered guests questions.
Those present were also introduced to the honorees by the individuals
who nominated them and then heard from the honorees about their career
in ham radio.  The brief talks were very entertaining and there were
many laughs.

Nearly forty door prizes, including numerous ARRL Handbooks, Antenna
Manuals, CQ Calendars and subscriptions and CD’s, were give away to
lucky attendees.   A contributory drawing for an Icom HT donated
personally by Gene Niemiec, K2KJI of KJI Electronics in Caldwell, NJ and
a Vertex Marine HT donated by Mario Karcich of Command Radio in
Hillsdale, NJ netted additional donations for the Spectrum Defense Fund
and made Ms. Carolyn Marrin, KC1JSH, the daughter of John Marrin, KB2KH
very happy with a new HT.

And the food was good!  We are already looking for a bigger place for
next year’s event.  We had to turn people away this year.

2003’s Technical Achievement Award winner is Len Signoretti Jr, N2LEN,
of Brooklyn, New York.  The specific achievement Len was recognized for
was the unique Echolink repeater/internet linking system he has
implemented, one of the first in the New York City area.

The 2003 Grand Ole Ham is Jim Joyce, K2ZO, of Washington Township, New
Jersey.  A 30 year member of the Bergen Amateur Radio Club, Jim has
devoted most of his free time to the club and to making Amateur Radio
operators more knowledgeable in the hobby.  He has spent two decades as
an Elmer, founding the club’s “kit night” in which hams could learn the
basics of building electronic equipment, how to solder, or how to
troubleshoot and repair their own equipment.

The 2003 Hudson Division Amateur of the Year is Bruce Lordi, N2XP, of
Flanders, New Jersey. A well rounded Amateur, Bruce has been described
as “Mr. Fixit”.  From HTs to Mobile equipment to repeaters, Bruce is
always ready to help hams with their technical problems.  Bruce gives
countless hours to helping hams and teaching others about technology.
He Elmers local Amateurs on the technology behind packet, PSK31, APRS,
HF, VHF and UHF techniques.

* HUDSON DIVISION DECEMBER QST AUTHORS

I know you spent a lot of time looking through the Field Day results and
that you spotted the two WECA members with their backs to us.  But ….
Just in case you missed it: The December issue of QST has two articles
by Hudson Division members and both are from Long Island.

“Your Uncle’s Meters” by Miles B. Anderson, K2CBY of Sag Harbor is a
five page article about bargain surplus meters.  “A Voice from the Ether
– B.H. “Tex” Burdick, W5BQU” is by Steve Barreres, K2CX of Plainview.
The article is about a 103 year old ham operator who has been on the air
for 70 years.

Thanks for some interesting reading and nice pictures, guys.

* ON THE BPL FRONT

The following Hudson Division clubs are on the honor roll as of
September 24, 2003:

Radio Club of America, Knickerbocker ARC, Technology Society of New
Jersey, Splitrock ARA Inc.,  Ocean Monmouth ARC, and Orange County
ARC.

Thanks for your generosity.  You can see a listing of all the clubs who
contributed to the fund on page 10 of  the November QST.  Clubs that
contributed after September 24th will be listed in a later issue.

Implementation of BPL technology in the US continues to be a real
threat.  Here are a few developments and interesting sites with
information:

Read Dave Sumner’s, K1ZZ, “Who Needs BPL?” in the Novermber issue of QST
twice and then frame it.

A subcommittee of an International Telecommunication Union (
http://www.itu.int/home/index.html ) panel of technical experts
responsible for terrestrial broadcasting issues has joined a growing
chorus of concern about the interference potential of power line
telecommunication (PLT)–better known in the US as Broadband over Power
Line (BPL).  See: http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/09/1/?nc=1

The ARRL has strongly objected to FCC Commissioner Kathleen Q.
Abernathy’s suggestion that Broadband over Power Line (BPL) technology
will contribute to what she described as “broadband Nirvana.”   See:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/09/25/100/?nc=1

Additional information and video clips are on the ARRL “Power Line
Communications (PLC) and Amateur Radio” page at
http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/

“Broadband from the electric company? No thanks” by David Coursey on
ZDNet at  http://reviews-zdnet.com.com/4520-7297_16-5089730.html for
some interesting reading on the subject.

==>ARRL SPONSORS BPL GATHERING FOR COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSIONALS

The interference potential of Broadband over Power Line (BPL) to
over-the-air radio services was the topic of an ARRL-sponsored meeting
of 25 communications professionals November 7. The National Association
of Broadcasters hosted the gathering at its headquarters in Washington,
DC.

“Listening to everyone introduce themselves and explain why they had
come to the meeting made the trip to Washington worthwhile all by
itself,” said ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, who offered opening remarks
and guided the discussion.  Sumner showed excerpts from the ARRL BPL
field test videos, which graphically demonstrate that BPL’s interference
potential at HF is real, not just theoretical.

During the meeting, representatives from the shortwave broadcasting,
public safety, aeronautical and scientific communities joined amateur
and amateur-satellite representatives to discuss the threat of BPL and
possible avenues to combat its interference potential to licensed HF and
low-VHF spectrum users. Military and consumer electronics
representatives participated as observers. Coming the farthest was Chip
Margelli, K7JA, who attended on behalf of the Yaesu Amateur Division of
Vertex-Standard.

ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, reviewed the status of last
April’s FCC’s Notice of Inquiry on BPL and noted that more than 5000
comments were filed with the Commission–most of them from Amateur Radio
operators. Imlay said that proposed FCC rules changes could come as soon
as early next year.

Imlay added that a number of non-amateur organizations support ARRL’s
position on BPL. Representing the National Association of Shortwave
Broadcasters, George Jacobs, W3ASK, affirmed their strong support for
the ARRL position.

ARRL Technical Relations Manager Paul Rinaldo, W4RI, provided a
technical review of BPL. BPL delivery systems would use existing low and
medium-voltage power lines to distribute Internet and other broadband
services to homes and businesses.

Other points the group touched upon included:

* BPL emission measurements by government agencies are under way, but
the results have not yet been made public. The FCC denied an ARRL
Freedom of Information Act request on the grounds that their test
results represent work-in-progress.

* A government representative observed that concerned groups should be
wary of tying in the overused term “homeland security” with any anti-BPL
campaign, since it could be spun back against BPL opponents.

* Meeting attendees cited numerous and increasing instances of
interference from Part 15 devices, suggesting that such instances only
infrequently result in complaints to the FCC–and even less frequently
in any FCC action.

A follow-up meeting may be held early next year if it becomes clear that
the FCC intends to release a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding
BPL. Some attendees indicated a willingness to accompany ARRL
representatives to meetings with federal officials to underscore that
concerns about BPL are not confined to radio amateurs.

“It’s apparent that concerns about BPL run very deep and include nearly
every over-the-air radio service,” Sumner remarked after the meeting.
“Now we can work together much more effectively to express our concerns
both inside and outside of government.”–Derek Riker, KB3JLF, compiled
information for this report

http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/11/14/101/?nc=1

* LIVING IN THE WAL-MART WORLD

“For now, it seems, RFID is just the latest cost of living in a Wal-Mart
world” says Matthew Boyle in a “Fortune” article.  See
http://www.fortune.com/fortune/technology/articles/0,15114,526418,00.html
for details.

Wal-Mart is apparently going to use the Part 15 technology on 900 MHz.
Apparently Wal-Mart has plans to implement RFID technology on its
shipping pallets but it may go further than that. Their real intent, not
mentioned in the article, may be to track your shopping cart from the
moment you enter the store, to see where you go first, what items you
pick up first, and how people travel around the store.  This information
will allow them to “arrange” the store better to suit the shopping
nature of the customers.

If you live near a Wal-Mart or one of their distribution center you may
see your noise floor increases on 902 MHz!!

>  “Logbook of the World” is Off Like a Rocket and Still Rising and now
working on MAC’s   — “Logbook of the World” (LoTW) –the League’s new
QSL-cardless awards and contact credit system–has proven to be a big
hit in the amateur community. LoTW opened September 15 to accept digital
certificate applications.  For more info see:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/02/2/?nc=1 (from ARRL Web)

If you have a Mac see
http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/11/06/1/?nc=1

In the six weeks the system has been open to the public, Logbook of the
World has accepted logs from 4,000 users from 158 DXCC entities. These
users–all with secure digital certificates–have uploaded 20,268,192
QSO records into the system, as of November 3. All of those contacts
have so far resulted in 335,196 QSL records being generated.  The
database is growing very rapidly.

* Haynie: Letters=Voters=Support on Amateur Radio Legislation

ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, says the good news is that the number
of House cosponsors for the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act, HR
713, has topped 50. The Senate version of the legislation, S 537, now
has eight cosponsors. The downside, Haynie says, is that the Spectrum
Protection Bill as well as the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications
Consistency Act, HR 1478, will need many more cosponsors if either is to
succeed.  See details at:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/16/2/?nc=1

Spectrum Protection Act Cosponsor List Takes a Giant Step (Nov 10, 2003)
— There’s encouraging news from Washington this week. The list of House
cosponsors for the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act, HR 713, has
nearly reached 70. ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, says he’s pleased
with the progress over the three weeks since he’d expressed his
frustration over the lack of cosponsors. Since mid-October, the list has
grown by 17 representatives. The Senate version of the legislation, S
537, is holding at eight cosponsors.  See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/11/10

We’re making some progress,” Haynie said, noting that the cosponsor list
now stands at 69. “I’m cheered up that we’ve got new representatives to
sign on, but we can’t just stop.” Haynie credited some of the growth to
a letter-writing campaign in Ohio–home to three of the new cosponsors.
He says the League has been concentrating its efforts on promoting HR
713 because the bill has the best chance for success of any Amateur
Radio-related legislation now before Congress.

Someone apparently was active in New Jersey as one of the seventeen new
sponsors is from NJ – Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ).

We need grass roots action here, folks!  Have you written or spoken to
your congressman about this issue?  This important bill will not happen
unless you do.

* CALIFORNIA FIRE COVERAGE

You may be interested in reading these two stories from the ARRL Web
page about Amateur Radio role in the recent California fires:

http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/29/102/?nc=1   and
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/31/100/?nc=1

* NJDXA ELECTIONS

The NJDXA is pleased to announce the officers for 2003-2004

President Rich Gelber, K2WR
Vice-President Steve Adell, KF2TI
Secretary Steve Saposnick, KB2ENF
Treasurer Gene Ingraham III, N2BIM

If you have questions about DX or getting incoming QSL cards visit the
NJDXA web site at: http://www.njdxa.org/

DX NEWS: A RARE ONE COMES ON IN NOVEMBER

The DXCC entity of Juan de Nova and Europa, ranked 9 in a 2002 survey of
most needed entities, will be coming on the air in November. Permission
to access either of these islands has not been possible to obtain in
many, many years.   A French group of dxpeditioners have secured
permission and will be operating as TO4E and TO4WW from Europa Island
from November 24th to December 15th.  They plan to operate on all bands
from 6 to 160 meters on SSB, CW, and RTTY. Europa, and Juan de Nova, are
located in the Mozambique Channel between Mozambique and Madagascar.
More details at http://europa2003.free.fr Here you will also find nice
photos of the island and propagation predictions to different areas
which can assist you in optimizing your chances to work this very rare
entity. Good luck in the pileups.

de Angel Garcia, WA2VUY, Hudson Division DX Advisory Council
Representative

* Operating 1×1 for the Tour de France

Enthusiasts of both Amateur Radio and cycling, two New Jersey hams
combined their interests to put on a unique special event.  For details
see: http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/11/11/1/?nc=1

The author is our own prolific Angel Garcia, WA2VUY, an avid 10 meter
DXer, with 341 countries confirmed on the band and a top spot on the
DXCC Honor Roll. Licensed since 1976, Garcia recently retired from the
New York Life Insurance Company after a 33 year career in information
systems management. He lists cycling and travel as his other major
interests. Garcia can be contacted via e-mail at wa2vuy@arrl.net.

* INTERESTED IN THE NYC SUBWAY ?

Some hams are and “Tracks of the New York City Subway” is a book by a
ham on the subject.  The author is Peter Dougherty, W2IRT, Maspeth, NY
who is an ARRL member.  Visit his website for more info:
http://www.nyctrackbook.com/ Interesting call Peter has for those of
us who ridden those “old” trains for years.

When he comes above ground, Peter apparently likes to work DX.

“Tracks of the New York City Subway,” as its name implies, is a 130+
page book containing depictions of every main line and yard track
(including track numbers) in the entire New York City subway system–all
722 miles of track and 468 stations of it! A 28-page introduction gives
the reader a brief history of the system, a primer on subway signaling
(including a color insert of the most commonly-encountered signs and
signals), details on chainage distances, towers, power
generation/distribution and a three-page detailed list of abandoned
stations.

* Attention Clubs and Instructors — New DVD and Other Class Materials
Available!

This is included again as you may have missed it in the last issue.

— For the first time, ARRL is presenting the ARRL Technician Class
Video Course on DVD. The video, also available in VHS format, features
new material and the previous content has been revised to make the
course even more valuable. Also, ARRL is offering clubs and instructors
the popular and effective Ham University license instruction software,
with a license to put the programs on the CD-ROM onto five different
computers. Perfect for a club that wants to teach a classroom-based
course on any of the three license levels. There is support for
instructors, too, in the form of manuals and on-line resources.
Discounts for instructors on selected course materials are also
available.   (de ARRL Web)

See:  http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/16/3/?nc=1

* ATTENTION CLUBS  – ARRL seeks opinions on Club Gazette

This is a must read for all club officers. I frequently get asked what
ARRL can do for clubs.  Please take a look at this section of the ARRL
web page for some very useful hints and suggestions.

— Attention clubs and ARRL affiliated club coordinators! ARRL Field
and Educational Services (F&ES) is hoping to add a Club Gazette feature
to its Club Companion pages at  http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club /.
The Gazette would feature the best stories, items and information
gleaned from the hundreds of club newsletters that hardworking
volunteers publish each month. Many clubs are justifiably proud of their
unique activities and active members, and being able to share their
successes and accomplishments may help other clubs to grow and prosper.
F&ES has put together a survey to help nail down the most useful
features of the Gazette. Questions were derived from items we’ve found
in hundreds of club newsletters. We’d like to know what you’d like to
see. To participate, click on the
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/10/4/gazette-survey.html and
follow the instructions. We appreciate your participation!   (from the
ARRL web pages)

* BIOGRAPHY OF W2JGR ON LINE

Many may remember long time LI resident and former LIDXA president,
W2JGR.  Jules is responsible for getting me back into RTTY in the late
1980’s.  He is very alive and well and now living in MN.  I recently
happened across his ham autobiography on the web.  If you knew Jules,
take a look.  You can email him at w2jgr@arrl.net.

http://www.aa5au.com/w2jgr.html

* FLARC: AUCTION ON NOVEMBER 28th

Here is a Thanksgiving Weekend activity after you polish off the turkey.
The Fair Lawn Amateur Radio Club (W2NPT) will be holding a Ham Radio
and Electronics auction on Friday November 28, 2003.  Information is on
their web site:  www.flarc.org.  The event will be held at a new
location, the Fair Lawn Fire House on George Street starting at 7:30 for
buyers. Sellers can enter at 6:15.

Thank you, Gene Ottenheimer, WB2HID, President FLARC

DIRECTIONS:
From Route 4 west: Take Route 208 North and take the second exit for
Fair Lawn Ave. (past overpass). George St. is the Sixth left turn.
Firehouse is two blocks down on your right.

From Route 287:  Exit onto Route 208 SOUTH. Get off at the Fair Lawn
Ave. Exit. Stay in the RIGHT lane and turn RIGHT at light as you leave
ramp. George St. is the fifth LEFT turn. Fire House is two blocks down
on your right.

From West bound Route 80: Take exit 61 River Rd. (507). Go down ramp and
stay to the RIGHT. At light on ramp make RIGHT turn. Follow River Rd.
for about 3 miles. At BERDAN Ave. make RIGHT turn. (Friendly’s Ice cream
on left side of intersection. Make FIRST RIGHT, GEORGE Street.

From East bound Route 80: Take exit 61 River Rd. (507). Go down ramp and
stay to the LEFT. At light on ramp make LEFT turn. Follow River Rd. for
about 3 miles. At BERDAN Ave. make RIGHT turn. (Friendly’s Ice cream on
left side of intersection. Make FIRST RIGHT, GEORGE Street.

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:  There are none.  The next event will be:

HRU 2004 on Sunday, January 18, 2004 at Oyster Bay, New York Sponsored
by Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club.  The event will be held at the
East Woods School located at 31 Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, NY

Although NOT a hamfest, this is a very worthwhile event being held for
the fourth year. Plan to be there.

You will meet a lot of hams and learn a thing or two at the forums.
Local clubs will be on hand showing off their activities and the price
is right at $2.00.

Directions: (The school is approximately 18 miles east of the
Queens/Nassau border in Nassau County)

Take the Long Island Expressway east to Exit 41 North (Rte 106/107). 106
and 107 will split about 1/2 mile north of the LIE, follow 106 north (to
the right). Go about 4 miles to Route 25A. Make a right and head east on
25A and go about 2 miles to Yellow Cote Road (on your left). Look for
the white sign which says “East Woods School”. Go another 1/2 mile and
the entrance to the school will be on your left at another white sign.
Go up the hill and park in one of the three designated parking areas.
Look for the HRU signs!

Special Features of Event: Ham Radio University 2004, forums on all
aspects of Amateur Radio, Special Event Station.  Exams being given:
ARRL Sponsored Exams

Talk-In Frequency: W2VL 146.850 -600 136.5 PL   Web URL:
http://www.hudson.org/nli/hru2004

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

Hudson Division Beacon – October 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
October 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org/

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org/

* ELECTIONS IN HUDSON DIVISION  – Please vote!

Most ballots for the Hudson Division Director election have been
received at this point.  As ballots are sent bulk mail some may take
weeks to dribble out to you.  If you have not received your ballot by
October 20th please contact Lisa Kustosik, 860-594-0245, at ARRL HQ for
a replacement ballot.

Please make your decision and send you ballot back in time to be
counted.   The message from both candidates:  Please vote and return the
ballot.  Ballots will be counted on November 21st at HQ and must be
received by noon that day.

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS DINNER November 8th in Paramus

There is still time to get a ticket, take and ad in the journal or
sponsor a plaque.  You will find information on the 10-70 web site at
http://www.10-70.org/   Simply scroll down to “Upcoming Events” and
click on “Hudson Dinner.”

We will have some nice door prizes and a contributory drawing for an
Icom HT and a Vertex Marine HT.  But you need to be present to
contribute and to win.  All monies will be sent to the ARRL Spectrum
Defense Fund for BPL.

Remember the Hudson Division Awards Dinner is again being sponsored by
the 10-70 Repeater Association and will be held on November 8th in
Northern New Jersey at Biaggio’s Resturante in Paramus, NJ by popular
request.  The food is good, the camaraderie is great and there are
plenty of door prizes for all.  Tickets are limited to the first 100 at
$38 per person.  Send ticket requests to 10-70 Repeater Association,
Inc., 235 Van Emburgh Avenue, Ridgewood, NJ  07450-2918.  A form is
available at http://www.10-70.org/

2003’s Technical Achievement Award winner is Len Signoretti Jr, N2LEN,
of Brooklyn, New York.  The specific achievement Len was recognized for
was the unique Echolink repeater/internet linking system he has
implemented, one of the first in the New York City area.

The 2003 Grand Ole Ham is Jim Joyce, K2ZO, of Washington Township, New
Jersey.  A 30 year member of the Bergen Amateur Radio Club, Jim has
devoted most of his free time to the club and to making Amateur Radio
operators more knowledgeable in the hobby.  He has spent two decades as
an Elmer, founding the club’s “kit night” in which hams could learn the
basics of building electronic equipment, how to solder, or how to
troubleshoot and repair their own equipment.

The 2003 Hudson Division Amateur of the Year is Bruce Lordi, N2XP, of
Flanders, New Jersey. A well rounded Amateur, Bruce has been described
as “Mr. Fixit”.  From HTs to Mobile equipment to repeaters, Bruce is
always ready to help hams with their technical problems.  Bruce gives
countless hours to helping hams and teaching others about technology.
He Elmers local Amateurs on the technology behind packet, PSK31, APRS,
HF, VHF and UHF techniques.

Please join with us to honor these outstanding Hudson Division hams.
You will also have a good time and perhaps take home a door prize.  Plan
on being with us on November 8th in Paramus.

* ON THE BPL FRONT

The following Hudson Division clubs are on the honor roll as of
September 24, 2003:

Radio Club of America, Knickerbocker ARC, Technology Society of New
Jersey, Splitrock ARA Inc.,  Ocean Monmouth ARC, and Orange County
ARC.

Thanks for your generosity.  You can see a listing of all the clubs who
contributed to the fund on page 10 of  the November QST.  Clubs that
contributed after September 24th will be listed in a later issue.

Implementation of BPL technology in the US continues to be a real
threat.  Here are a few developments and interesting sites with
information:

Read Dave Sumner’s, K1ZZ, “Who Needs BPL?” in the Novermber issue of QST
twice and then frame it.

A subcommittee of an International Telecommunication Union (
http://www.itu.int/home/index.html ) panel of technical experts
responsible for terrestrial broadcasting issues has joined a growing
chorus of concern about the interference potential of power line
telecommunication (PLT)–better known in the US as Broadband over Power
Line (BPL).  See: http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/09/1/?nc=1

The ARRL has strongly objected to FCC Commissioner Kathleen Q.
Abernathy’s suggestion that Broadband over Power Line (BPL) technology
will contribute to what she described as “broadband Nirvana.”   See:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/09/25/100/?nc=1

Additional information and video clips are on the ARRL “Power Line
Communications (PLC) and Amateur Radio” page at
http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/

“Broadband from the electric company? No thanks” by David Coursey on
ZDNet at  http://reviews-zdnet.com.com/4520-7297_16-5089730.html for
some interesting reading on the subject.

>  “Logbook of the World” is Off Like a Rocket and Still Rising   —
“Logbook of the World” (LoTW) –the League’s new QSL-cardless awards and
contact credit system–has proven to be a big hit in the amateur
community. LoTW opened September 15 to accept digital certificate
applications.  For more info see:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/02/2/?nc=1 (from ARRL Web)

Here are the latest statistics as of October 15, 2003:

14,578,052 QSO records have been entered into the system.
181,402 QSL records have resulted.
3,156 Users are registered in the system
3,983 Certificates are active
9,446 User files have been processed

The database is growing very rapidly.

>  Haynie: Letters=Voters=Support on Amateur Radio Legislation (Oct 16,
2003) — ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, says the good news is that
the number of House cosponsors for the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection
Act, HR 713, has topped 50. The Senate version of the legislation, S
537, now has eight cosponsors. The downside, Haynie says, is that the
Spectrum Protection Bill as well as the Amateur Radio Emergency
Communications Consistency Act, HR 1478, will need many more cosponsors
if either is to succeed.  See details at:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/16/2/?nc=1

>  THANKS FOR RESPONDING TO THE HUDSON DIVISION CW TESTING SURVEY

I have not yet begun to process the survey and come up with results. I
probably will not get to that until after the November 8 Awards Dinner.
I expect to print results in the December issue of “Beacon.”  I have
made hard copies of the responses.  I have had e-mail problems lately –
Msimm errors while running Outlook Express – which have resulted in lost
messages, fortunately none of them surveys, and the inability to send
message.  I am still slowly responding to those who sent in a survey.
At this point I still have not to been able to respond to everyone.  It
appears that I will probably have to reinstall Windows to cure my
problem as Norton did not find any problems with Outlook or any .DLL
files but I believe that one or more of them are “munged.”

Most Survey responders did not add comments but I found those who did
very interesting.  Below are two who wanted change.  Next month I will
plan to print two from the opposite viewpoint.

Here is number one:

I am a very enthusiastic CW user – 90% of my operations. I also collect
telegraph keys and paraphernalia so there are fewer true believers in
code than me. However I don’t think CW is necessary or appropriate any
longer for licensing purposes. I do believe the CW subbands must be
protected though.

Even the most ardent CW fans with the greatest communications skills are
severely challenged to make it’s case given the state of technology
(i.e. Internet, cellular phones, etc.) and the perception around it by
the general public. At best people will think strong advocacy to retain
CW as a license requirement is based on quaintness of a severely aging
group of people who are slowly fading into the sunset anyway. My fear is
ham radio may, in fact, be fading into sunset and the demographics of
the people becoming hams is showing alarmingly poor take-up among our
youth. If we are to keep ham radio going yet another century we will
need to embrace far more young people into our ranks – despite whatever
interest they may, or may not have in Morse code communication.

Don’t get me wrong, however, I do not advocate a no-brains class of
license or a “dumbed-down” ham radio. Quite the contrary.

Ham radio never had a wide appeal among the general public even in it’s
“hayday”. It appealed to people of a scientific bent. This NEVER meant
solely degreed engineers or Nobel laureates (although it always included
those types of people) but rather those with a technical curiosity or
inclination. And that’s how it should be now.

I am not suggesting sharply toughened technical exams in lieu of Morse
but rather better exams which will demonstrate knowledge of operating
conditions, modes, equipment types, rules, operating practice, ham radio
history. These should include internet questions, PC componentry,
digitized communications techniques, etc.

Frank, the wireless industry is not only about radios any more. Hell,
radios are not only about radios anymore as the next generation will be
software based entirely – not just analog boxes with digital readouts.
Nearly every “wireless” device is not only processor based and software
controlled but what it “talks” to is likely to be software based and
processor controlled. Voice over IP is an emerging technology which
although already in widespread commercial service is in great need of
far more R&D to enhance voice quality and robustness ESPECIALLY in the
wireless environment. And who, but hams, are better suited to do this
work? Or to work in network deployment, maintenance, etc.

We are truly missing the boat IF we don’t embrace the new digitized
world or ILRP, EchoLink, Packet Clusters, software controlled rigs, etc.
Plenty of kids can play with PC’s and there are few school systems which
don’t support classes using computers. But how many have “wireless”
based instruction? I can tell you even in graduate engineering school
there is precious little practical wireless (radio) experimentation and
subsequent experience. ATTENTION HAM RADIO – the world is calling — we
need a place for young people with a technical inclination to experiment
and play with radios and computers — now is the time…

Pete Malvese, W2PM

And here is the second, which may also appear in QST:

Over the years I’ve thought a lot about the need for a CW requirement in
amateur radio licensing but until now haven’t put any ideas on paper
(virtual or not). Recently, the dropping of the requirement in
international regulation has renewed the debate. It’s always been an
emotional issue with hams; one look at the discourse in the on-line
forums will confirm that. Rather than getting nasty with each other,
let’s calm down a bit, take a deep breath and consider what’s really
involved in how we’re regulated by the FCC. Whether one is for or
against it, the issue reduces to a matter of what the FCC will accept in
arguments and what it won’t. So we need to be rational about it, not
emotional.

First, let’s recognize the difference between CW – the requirement, and
CW – the mode of operation. I operate HF almost exclusively, spending
about half my time on CW, half phone, have always been active on CW, and
am very good at it. I consider the license requirement to be separable
from whether or not CW will continue to be popular on HF. I believe it
will, no matter what happens in the requirements debate. The most
important thing is that the FCC as a regulatory body should retain band
segments restricted to CW and narrow digital modes only. There are
rational reasons, having to do with interference, why it’s necessary to
keep wide bandwidth modes away from narrow ones. That’s a very practical
thing, as opposed to the issue of licensing requirements which is mostly
emotional in my view.

The ARRL should not fight removal of the code requirement unless we, the
amateur radio community can come up with a rational reason as to why
every licensee must know it. The key word here is “rational”. The FCC
will not judge as valid any argument to keep a code requirement that has
anything to do with emotional reasons. For example, the argument can’t
be about tradition – it’s irrelevant. Spark was tradition at one point
but banned for practical reasons. No argument based on tradition holds
water. The argument can’t be about filtering applicants. Sure, a Morse
requirement is another hurdle that will disqualify some applicants. But
since there are other ways of “raising the bar” on applicants, such as
requiring more in-depth knowledge of communications technology in the
written test, the filtering argument will not fly with the FCC either.
The argument also can’t make the claim that elimination of the
requirement will cause CW to “die”. Horseback riding and biking are
alive and well even though people are not forced to learn how to do
either one, and there are cars. CW will continue to be widely used
simply because it’s the best non-machine-assisted way to communicate
under weak signal conditions. It’s flawed reasoning to suggest that
endorsing the removal of the code requirement is a vote to “kill” CW. So
the “cw will die” argument has no validity with the FCC as well. Lastly,
we can’t use the “slippery slope” argument in which we assert that
elimination of the code requirement is only the first step in lowering
standards and it will lead to a step-by-step, inexorable, decrease in
license requirements until we’re left with none at all. This can also be
referred to the “ham radio will become CB” argument and it too doesn’t
fly. A change in a specific license requirement does not imply a change
(or decrease in the need for) license requirements in general. It’s an
emotional argument and will not be considered otherwise by the FCC.

So unless the ARRL can come up with practical, rational, reasons why a
Morse requirement should be retained, it should not waste resources to
take up the issue. Only one such practical reason would suffice. I just
haven’t heard any yet. The last one may have gone away when the
international community decided to stop requiring knowledge of the code.

Many hams including myself will continue to use CW because we enjoy it
(emotional) but also because it’s the best way to work DX when the band
conditions are lousy (rational). As a separate issue the ARRL should
vigorously work to protect the existence of HF band segments for narrow
bandwidth modes including CW.

73,
Chris Codella, W2PA
w2pa@arrl.net

* Attention Clubs and Instructors — New DVD and Other Class Materials
Available!

— For the first time, ARRL is presenting the ARRL Technician Class
Video Course on DVD. The video, also available in VHS format, features
new material and the previous content has been revised to make the
course even more valuable. Also, ARRL is offering clubs and instructors
the popular and effective Ham University license instruction software,
with a license to put the programs on the CD-ROM onto five different
computers. Perfect for a club that wants to teach a classroom-based
course on any of the three license levels. There is support for
instructors, too, in the form of manuals and on-line resources.
Discounts for instructors on selected course materials are also
available.   (de ARRL Web)
See:  http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/16/3/?nc=1

* CQWW SSB CONTEST OCT. 24th through 26th

Here is a great opportunity to add some countries for you DXCC Award.
There will be a lot of activity and many of the multi-multi DX stations
will be looking for business on Sunday when their rates slow down.  If
you have low power and are antenna challenged, you will find that it is
possible on Sunday morning and afternoon to work some rare ones and up
your count.   Check Ten Meters.  It has been open in a few times in the
last week.  Last Monday, Columbus Day, I worked YI/KC0LEK, in Baghdad
with only 100 watts with very few other stations on the band.

I plan to be in Vermont with members of the Order of Boiled Owls as one
of the W2AX operators.

* ATTENTION CLUBS  – ARRL seeks opinions on Club Gazette

This is a must read for all club officers.  There is some very
interesting information here:

— Attention clubs and ARRL affiliated club coordinators! ARRL Field
and Educational Services (F&ES) is hoping to add a Club Gazette feature
to its Club Companion pages at  http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/.
The Gazette would feature the best stories, items and information
gleaned from the hundreds of club newsletters that hardworking
volunteers publish each month. Many clubs are justifiably proud of their
unique activities and active members, and being able to share their
successes and accomplishments may help other clubs to grow and prosper.
F&ES has put together a survey to help nail down the most useful
features of the Gazette. Questions were derived from items we’ve found
in hundreds of club newsletters. We’d like to know what you’d like to
see. To participate, click on the
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/10/10/4/gazette-survey.html and
follow the instructions. We appreciate your participation!   (from the
ARRL web pages)

> >>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:  There are none.  The next event will be:

HRU 2004 on Sunday, January 18, 2004 at Oyster Bay, New York Sponsored
by Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club.  The event will be held at the
East Woods School located at 31 Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, NY

Although NOT a hamfest, this is a very worthwhile event being held for
the fourth year. Plan to be there. You will meet a lot of hams and learn
a thing or two at the forums.  Local clubs will be on hand showing off
their activities and the price is right at $2.00.

Directions: (The school is approximately 18 miles east of the
Queens/Nassau border in Nassau County) Take the Long Island Expressway
east to Exit 41 North (Rte 106/107). 106 and 107 will split about 1/2
mile north of the LIE, follow 106 north (to the right). Go about 4 miles
to Route 25A. Make a right and head east on 25A and go about 2 miles to
Yellow Cote Road (on your left). Look for the white sign which says
“East Woods School”. Go another 1/2 mile and the entrance to the school
will be on your left at another white sign. Go up the hill and park in
one of the three designated parking areas. Look for the HRU signs!

Special Features of Event: Ham Radio University 2004, forums on all
aspects of Amateur Radio, Special Event Station.  Exams being given:
ARRL Sponsored Exams

Talk-In Frequency: W2VL 146.850 -600 136.5 PL   Web URL:
http://www.hudson.org/nli/hru2004

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

Hudson Division Beacon – September 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
September 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

* ARRL remembers victims of September 11

— On the second anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terror
attacks, the ARRL remembers those who lost their lives.  They included
seven Amateur Radio operators who died in the World Trade Center and
Pentagon disasters: Steven A. “Steve” Jacobson, N2SJ, 53, an ARRL member
and a WPIX transmitter engineer from New York City; William V. “Bill”
Steckman, WA2ACW, of West Hempstead, New York, a WNBC transmitter
engineer; Michael G. Jacobs, AA1GO, 54, an ARRL member from Danbury,
Connecticut; Robert D. “Bob” Cirri Sr, KA2OTD, 39, an ARRL member from
Nutley, New Jersey, and ARRL Hudson County District Emergency
Coordinator.  A Port Authority Police officer, Cirri was helping to
evacuate occupants from the World Trade Center when it collapsed;
William R. “Bill” Ruth, W3HRD, 58, of Mt Airy, Maryland, an ARRL member,
who died in Pentagon attack.  He was a Vietnam and Gulf War veteran and
worked in the Pentagon; Gerard J. “Rod” Coppola, KA2KET, 46, of New York
City; and Winston A. Grant, KA2DRF, 59, of West Hempstead, New York.

* ELECTIONS IN HUDSON DIVISION  – Please vote!

Ballots for the Hudson Division Director election will begin arriving in
your mail-box around October 1.  As ballots are sent bulk mail some may
take weeks to dribble out to you.  Please make your decision and send
you ballot back in time to be counted in late November.  If you have not
received a ballot by November 1, please contact HQ for a replacement.

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS DINNER November 8th in Paramus

The Hudson Division Awards Dinner is again being sponsored by the 10-70
Repeater Association and will be held on November 8th in Northern New
Jersey at Biaggio’s Resturante in Paramus, NJ by popular request.  The
food is good, the camaraderie is great and there are plenty of door
prizes for all. Tickets are limited to the first 100 at $38 per person.
Send ticket requests to 10-70 Repeater Association, Inc., 235 Van
Emburgh Avenue, Ridgewood, NJ  07450-2918

2003’s Technical Achievement Award winner is Len Signoretti Jr, N2LEN,
of Brooklyn, New York.  The specific achievement Len was recognized for
was the unique Echolink repeater/internet linking system he has
implemented, one of the first in the New York City area.

The 2003 Grand Ole Ham is Jim Joyce, K2ZO, of Washington Township, New
Jersey.  A 30 year member of the Bergen Amateur Radio Club, Jim has
devoted most of his free time to the club and to making Amateur Radio
operators more knowledgeable in the hobby.  He has spent two decades as
an Elmer, founding the club’s “kit night” in which hams could learn the
basics of building electronic equipment, how to solder, or how to
troubleshoot and repair their own equipment.

The 2003 Hudson Division Amateur of the Year is Bruce Lordi, N2XP, of
Flanders, New Jersey. A well rounded Amateur, Bruce has been described
as “Mr. Fixit”.  From HTs to Mobile equipment to repeaters, Bruce is
always ready to help hams with their technical problems.  Bruce gives
countless hours to helping hams and teaching others about technology.
He Elmers local Amateurs on the technology behind packet, PSK31, APRS,
HF, VHF and UHF techniques.

Please join with us to honor these outstanding Hudson Division hams.
You will also have a good time and perhaps take home a door prize.  Plan
on being with us on November 8th in Paramus.

*  LogBook or LoTW has ARRIVED

On Monday September 15, 2003 Logbook of the World opened for business.
See http://www.arrl.org/lotw/  It will eventually offer a new way to get
credits for awards like DXCC, WAS and the DXCC Challenge.  October QST
has information about the program on page 46.

Step by step instructions are found on the Getting Started section.
http://www.arrl.org/lotw/getstart.html

If you used the Beta system, it’s important to remember that the
sequence of events is different because the full security protocol is in
effect.  In the Beta test, you received your password and digital
certificate via email shortly after submitting the request.

In the final production system, after you upload your certificate
request you will receive an acknowledgement, and your request will be
sent to the Logbook administrator in the DXCC branch for approval. Once
approved, a unique password will be printed on a postcard and mailed to
your FCC database address. With that password, you can receive your
digital certificate via Web or email, install it on your computer, and
begin signing logs and submitting them to the system as before.

The first of the postcards will to be processed and mailed later this
week, and after that QSOs can start flowing into the system.

* CW TESTING Petitions at FCC

A number of petitions to drop or maintain cw or Morse testing as a
license requirement have been filed with the FCC as a result of action
taken at WRC 2003.  The decision of WRC-03 in late July to eliminate
Morse Code proficiency as a international requirement for amateur access
to frequencies below 30 MHz has left it to each country to decide
whether to retain Morse Code proficiency as a requirement for access to
HF frequencies.

For details see http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/08/29/2/?nc=1
ARRL policy is not to comment on other’s proposals unless they involve
spectrum issues and these proposals do not.  ARRL has begun the process
of developing its own proposal.

Once the process of collecting comments on all Morse code-related
petitions is completed, the FCC may determine that a Notice of Proposed
Rule Making (NPRM) is in order. The Commission at that point could
incorporate all Morse-related rule making petitions into a single
proceeding. The NPRM would get a docket number, and the comment process
would begin anew.  A good guess is that this will happen about
Hamvention time next spring.

Meanwhile the ARRL Board has begun formulating its own proposal.  A
committee headed by ARRL First Vice President Joel Harrison, W5ZN, has
been tasked to develop a set of proposals to be set before the ARRL
Board by December 2003 and voted upon at the January 2004 ARRL Board
meeting.  The resulting proposal will then be filed with the FCC a month
or so later and certainly before the FCC concludes action on the
petitions already before it.  Whatever the ARRL proposes and the FCC
eventually determines to implement will probably be put into effect by
mid 2005, about two years away.

In order to help me decide how I will vote I need to get input from
Hudson Division ARRL members.  This will help determine how I will vote
in January.

Though license structure and exam content are not directly part of the
Morse issue several petitions suggest that the current license structure
and exam content should also be changed.  Those petitions that discuss
license structure generally suggest a three-tier license structure of
Entry, General and Extra licenses. Proposals as to content vary from
suggestions to make the Entry level license a simple written exam of
perhaps 25 questions, concentrating on operating practice, essential
rules, and very basic technical matters on one hand to increasing
emphasis and difficulty of technical content on the other.

So far I have received very few comments from members in the Hudson
Division on these questions.  As we have the ability to send information
to Division member it seemed like a good idea to get member opinions on
these issues.

I have prepared a short questionnaire. You shouldn’t feel limited to the
questions and alternatives in the questionnaire. Feel free to add your
comments. Hearing the reasons why you prefer one alternative is even
more helpful.  Your answers will help me reach a decision as to how I
will vote on the ARRL proposal in January.

Please cut and paste the survey below and send your replies to me at
n2ff@arrl.org

1. Do you think ARRL should fight the elimination of Morse Code
requirements for licensing?

___Yes                    ___No

2. Do you think ARRL should petition FCC to abolish Morse Code
requirements for licensing?

___Yes                     ___No

3. Provided you think ARRL should fight elimination of Morse Code
requirements (see No. 1, above) please select either a, b or c to
indicate how hard we should fight to keep the code requirement:

___ a. Drop everything else (e.g., the fight against BPL, the fight to
pass legislation to protect our frequencies, the fight against
restrictions on antenna structures).

___ b. Drop all but the most important projects (e.g., the fight against
BPL).

___ c. File a petition with FCC to keep the code requirement, but do
nothing else.

4. Entry level Amateurs should pass a Morse Code test to have HF
frequency privileges.

__ Strongly Agree

__ Agree

__ No Opinion

__ Disagree

__Strongly Disagree

5.      General Class Amateurs should pass a Morse Code test to have HF
frequency privileges.

__Strongly Agree

__Agree

__No Opinion

__Disagree

__Strongly Disagree

6.    Extra Class Amateurs should pass a Morse Code test to have HF
frequency privileges.

__Strongly Agree

__Agree

__No Opinion

__Disagree

__Strongly Disagree

7.    If the Morse Proficiency requirement is eliminated there still should
be portions of each band limited to CW and narrow band data.

__Strongly Agree

__Agree

__No Opinion

__Disagree

__Strongly Disagree

8.    Entry level licenses should include access to

__ VHF and UHF frequencies only

__  Limited portions of one or two HF bands and VHF and UHF frequencies.

__  Limited portions of three or four HF bands and VHF and UHF frequencies.

__  Limited portions of all HF bands and VHF and UHF frequencies.

__  All General Class portions of two HF bands and VHF and UHF frequencies.

9.       Entry level licenses should be limited to
__  5 Watts on HF
__  50 Watts on HF
__  100 Watts on HF
__   250 Watts on HF
__   Normal amateur power limits

10.     Entry level licenses should be for a term of
__  Two years  non-renewable
__  Two years  but renewable
__  Ten years renewable

11.    I have been a Ham for  ____ years

12.    I took my last Amateur license exam
__  from a VE Team
__  from an FCC Examiner

13.       How important is the Morse Issue to you?
……  Crucial
……  Very Important
……  Somewhat Important
……  Not Important
…..   Unimportant

Please add any Comments.

Thanks for taking the time to let me know your thoughts.

73,  de Frank Fallon  N2FF,  Hudson Division Director

* 27th NEW YORK CITY MARATHON – November 2nd

Once again The New York Road Runners Club will host the 27th annual New
York City Marathon on November 2nd. And, for the 27th year, Amateur
Radio operators are being asked to provide communications.

This race is the largest “people’s” event that the city hosts each year
and requires over 400 Amateur Radio operators to fulfill the unique
requirements set forth by the race officials.

This is the largest public service event in America each year. Come and
be part of a world class event while helping over 30,000 runners achieve
their dream.

Operations will take place on Staten Island from 4 AM to 11 AM,
Brooklyn, and Queens from 6 AM to noon and in Manhattan and the Bronx
from 7 AM to 3 PM. We are looking for those who have done public service
events for years and those who have never been involved before.

Everyone receives training and a manual to help prepare for the day.  If
you have never done an event like this before you will be surprised at
how much fun it is. The tee shirts will make you the envy of your club.

For further information, to get questions answered or to volunteer
please contact the Communication Coordinator, Steve Mendelsohn, W2ML,
at: w2ml@arrl.org

*   DRIVING PROBLEMS

Correction:  Some folks had trouble getting to the NYS law which covers
“extended receive” capabilities. This is not easy and obvious but if you
follow the directions you will get there.

For the NYS law go to  http://www.senate.state.ny.us/  and select “Bills
and Laws” which is the third item down on the left side.  Then under
Legislative Session Information select Laws of New York which is the
fifth item in the list.  Under “Consolidated Laws” select VAT (for
Vehicle and Traffic Laws) and scroll then down to section 397 which is
the specific law and print a copy of New York State Vehicle and Traffic
Laws Title 3 Article 12 Section 397.

You will need to do the same for the hands free bill. It is on the same
site under Article 33 “Miscellaneous Rules” and is Section 1225C, which
is the provision covering the use of mobile telephones.  The operative
word you will see is telephone.

You will now feel like a legal scholar.  Print out both sections and put
them in your glove compartment.

*   Court kicks New York ham’s “police radio” case:

A New York court has dismissed a misdemeanor charge against ARRL member
Richard C. “Dick” Lalone, KC5GAX, for violating &sect;397 of that
state’s Vehicle and Traffic Law. That section prohibits individuals
other than law officers from equipping their vehicles with radios
“capable of receiving signals on the frequencies allocated for police
use” without first securing a permit. The section, which also prohibits
knowingly interfering with police transmissions, contains an explicit
exemption for “any person who holds a valid amateur radio operator’s
license . . . and who operates a duly licensed portable mobile
transmitter and in connection therewith a receiver or receiving set on
frequencies exclusively allocated . . . to duly licensed radio
amateurs.” In his nearly 1300-word decision, Judge John J. Hallet called
&sect;397 “probably the most poorly drafted section of the Vehicle and
Traffic Law.” While noting that the rationale behind the statute was to
keep criminals from monitoring police calls, he said it was clear the
legislature never intended the provisions of &sect;397 from applying to
licensed Amateur Radio operators, and he dismissed the charge August 5.
Susan Terry, KF4SUE, a former New York assistant attorney general,
represented Lalone.  ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, ARRL General
Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, and ARRL Regulatory Information Specialist
John Hennessee, N1KB, provided advice or assistance to Lalone.    (from
the ARRL Web Page)

* ARRL SURVEY  NOT A HOAX

Some of you may get an ARRL Survey in the mail.  Please answer it.  Some
folks will get them and others will not.  Please don’t feel bad.  I have
been an ARRL member for 39 years and only once did I get one in the
mail.

A Readex Survey is in the Mail

Materials for the first of two Readex surveys we are conducting this
Fall are in the mail. We typically receive a few questions from members
asking if ARRL really commissioned the survey. If anyone asks, please
tell them that we did indeed commission Readex to conduct a survey, and
ask that they take a few minutes to complete and return it. Each
response is important.

This survey is going to a small selection of members, former members and
never members and covers their amateur radio interests and activity
levels, as well as their knowledge and perceptions of ARRL.

The second survey — a periodic QST Reader Survey — will be sent in a
few weeks to ARRL members only. That one focuses on QST content,
demographics and issues of interest to advertisers.

Each person in the survey sample will receive an “alert letter” saying
that the survey is coming, then the survey booklet itself, then
reminders and duplicate survey booklets as required to get to the needed
response.

73, Mark K1RO

>  MCLIC assists with Central New Jersey repeater interference issues:

The Monmouth County Local Interference Committee (MCLIC) formed a year
ago at the direction of ARRL Northern New Jersey Section Manager Bill
Hudzik, W2UDT, in response to a rise in repeater jamming and
interference complaints, especially during ARES, RACES and National
Traffic System (NTS) nets. MCLIC’s primary geographical focus is
Monmouth County, New Jersey. A component of the Amateur Auxiliary, local
interference committees may be commissioned by an ARRL SM with an
Official Observer as chair to investigate and resolve repeater
interference problems. MCLIC functions as an advisory committee to
Monmouth County repeater sponsors in specific jamming cases and as a
technical and investigative resource. MCLIC also is in need of
additional, dedicated volunteers, especially those with experience in
radio frequency monitoring, recording and direction finding. For more
information, visit the MCLIC Web site.   (from “In Brief” on the ARRL
Web page )

* BEWARE INTERNET SCAMS

The moral of the story here is: Beware E-mail requests for information,
even those from companies you deal with.  Here is a heads up that may
save you a great deal of grief.  The following is an e-mail from an
unnamed ARRL Vice Director who was bitten by this one:

The e-mail you received was not from eBay. It is a forged e-mail that
APPEARS to have come from eBay, and in fact was generated by a ring of
thieves who have been scamming eBay users who use their e-mail address
as their eBay user ID. The link in the e-mail APPEARS to go to eBay, but
in fact goes to a web page setup by the thieves to collect your
personal, credit card, bank account and PayPal account information.
Whatever you provide to them on that page will be used for theft. People
who have fallen for this have had credit cards maxed out, bank accounts
emptied out and PayPal accounts cleared out. I fell for one of them, but
only provided a credit card number… they compromised it within minutes
and tried to steal my identity (using the information to open a line of
credit in my name at Dell Computer so they could buy hundreds of
computers using my good name).

My first advisory is to change you eBay account name to something other
than your e-mail address (this makes it more difficult for them to send
you scam e-mails as your address will not be so readily known to them).
My second advisory is to never trust links in e-mails. If you think eBay
or PayPal or anyone else has asked you to update information, don’t
click on the link in the e-mail (the name displayed in the link may not
be where it really goes… the actual address it goes to is hidden in
the HTML for the link)… just open a new browser window and go to the
site the way you always do and use THAT page to see if there really is
an account problem.

By the way, eBay works hard to shut these guys down, but they just move
to another server and start again. You can forward notes like this to
scam@ebay.com and they will investigate them.

* HAM RADIO FOR DUMMIES MAY BE COMING TO A BOOK STORE NEAR YOU

We have all heard too often about the “dumbing down of ham radio,” well
get this:

According to author Ward Silver, N0AX, his manuscript for the new book
“Ham Radio for Dummies” will be completed by the end of 2003. This is an
addition to Wiley Publishing’s well-known “Dummies” series and stands a
good chance of getting wide distribution in the consumer book market.

Daaah!

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:  This is the last of the Hamfests for 2003.
Shop while you can!

5 Oct 2003 + Hall of Science ARC
http://www.qsl.net/hosarc
Queens, NY
Div: Hudson
Sect: New York City-Long Island
Contact:Stephen Greenbaum, WB2KDG
5-10 34th Avenue
Jackson Heights, NY 11372
Phone: 718-898-5599
Email: wb2kdg@arrl.net

11 Oct 2003 + Bergen ARA
http://www.bara.org
Washington Township, NJ
Div: Hudson
Sect: Northern New Jersey
Contact:James Joyce, K2ZO
286 Ridgewood Blvd.
North Washington Township, NJ 07676
Phone: 201-664-6725
Email: k2zo@arrl.net

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

Hudson Division Beacon – August 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
August 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

* THERE IS HOPE FOR HAM RADIO!

We hear much about young people not joining our ranks.  But they are
there.  Some times we just do not see them.  Certainly we would like to
see more of them.  Take a look at the September 2003 QST soon to arrive
in your mailbox.  The article “An Easy to Build, Dual-Band Collinear
Antenna” on page 28 was written by an Extra who is a seventeen-year-old
high school student licensed for three years.  I’m considering building
the antenna and taking it to England next time I visit my daughter.  I
think I can fit it in my luggage provided I wait to purchase the PVC
pipe and glue it together after I arrive.  I hope it will do well from
the third floor bedroom.

* ARRL JULY BOARD MEETING

Items about the July ARRL Board meeting will appear in the August issue
but you can read the minutes in their entirety at
http://www.arrl.org/announce/board-0307/

WORLD RADIO CONFERENCE 2003 – The Board reviewed progress made at WRC
2003 and started the planning cycle for the next WRC in 2007. One key
item on the 2007 agenda is a review of 4-10MHz frequency allocations
(Recent amateur gains at 7.0 – 7.2 MHz are excluded from this review.)
There is a six page article by K1ZZ in the August QST.

BAND PLANNING – The Board conducted an in-depth review of the amateur
bands from 902 MHz to 24 GHz, with emphasis on defense strategies and
deployment (usage) levels. Board action was taken to create an ad-hoc
committee to recommend updates to the ARRL band plans.

BAND SEGMENTATION – The Board received an interim report detailing
technical studies of amateur frequency band segmentation based on
emission bandwidth rather than mode. This study is necessary because of
the emergence of new digital modes, including digital voice and
voice-bandwidth digital data modes. This study could lead to replacing
the familiar CW/Phone segmentation with Narrowband/Voiceband
segmentation.

ELMERS TO THE FORE – What changes in licensing structure are in store
for Amateur Radio in the USA? How will the Morse Code testing issue be
resolved? Is there a new entry-level license in our future, perhaps
modelled after the UK Foundation License? Regardless of how these issues
are resolved, Amateur Radio needs a corps of Mentors (or Elmers, if you
prefer) to help guide newcomers through the early rites of passage in
Amateur Radio – especially the oft daunting transition from license
study to on-the-air communications. In recognition of these concerns,
the Board commissioned its Volunteer Resources Committee to develop a
national mentor (Elmer) program for consideration at the ARRL Board’s
January 2004 meeting.

FIELD ORGANIZATION ENHANCEMENT – The Board approved the following
measures intended to strengthen the League’s Field Organization: a)
Provide leadership training for Section Managers b) Develop and release
Section Emergency Plans c) Improve long-haul ARES communications
capability d) Implement other actions per the Board Report

SO WHAT’S THE FIELD ORGANIZATION? – The ARRL Field Organization consists
of regional cadres of volunteers under the leadership of Section
Managers.   In the Hudson Division, our Sections are:

Eastern New York (ENY),  Northern New Jersey (NNJ),  New York City Long
Island (NLI)

Section Manager contact info is listed on page 16 of QST.

What to Do About Morse? Code Requirement Remains on the Books in US,
Canada (Jul 22, 2003) — World Radiocommunication Conference 2003
(WRC-03) made optional the requirement to prove the ability to send and
receive Morse signals to operate below 30 MHz. While a Morse code exam
element remains on the books in the US, Canada and elsewhere, some
countries already have moved to drop their Morse requirements. In the
US, however, Morse will not go away that easily, since the FCC appears
unlikely to act on its own motion to make that happen.  See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/07/22/1/?nc=1

Just in case you aren’t aware, the UK has dropped the Morse requirement
for access to the HF bands as from the 26th July 2003.

The ARRL Directors will begin to develop a position on the issue at a
Strategic Planning meeting to be held in Saint Louis, MO in September.

* HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS DINNER  November 8th in Paramus

The Hudson Division Awards Dinner is again being sponsored by the 10-70
Repeater Association and will be held on November 8th in Northern New
Jersey at Biaggio’s Resturante in Paramus, NJ by popular request.  The
food is good, the camaraderie is great and there are plenty of door
prizes for all. Tickets are limited to the first 100 at $38 per person.
Send ticket requests to 10-70 Repeater Association, Inc., 235 Van
Emburgh Avenue, Ridgewood, NJ  07450-2918

2003’s Technical Achievement Award winner is Len Signoretti Jr, N2LEN,
of Brooklyn, New York.  The specific achievement Len was recognized for
was the unique Echolink repeater/internet linking system he has
implemented, one of the first in the New York City area.

The 2003 Grand Ole Ham is Jim Joyce, K2ZO, of Washington Township, New
Jersey.  A 30 year member of the Bergen Amateur Radio Club, Jim has
devoted most of his free time to the club and to making Amateur Radio
operators more knowledgeable in the hobby.  He has spent two decades as
an Elmer, founding the club’s “kit night” in which hams could learn the
basics of building electronic equipment, how to solder, or how to
troubleshoot and repair their own equipment.

The 2003 Hudson Division Amateur of the Year is Bruce Lordi, N2XP, of
Flanders, New Jersey. A well rounded Amateur, Bruce has been described
as “Mr. Fixit”.  From HTs to Mobile equipment to repeaters, Bruce is
always ready to help hams with their technical problems.  Bruce gives
countless hours to helping hams and teaching others about technology.
He Elmers local Amateurs on the technology behind packet, PSK31, APRS,
HF, VHF and UHF techniques.

Please join with us to honor these outstanding Hudson Division hams.
You will also have a good time and perhaps take home a door prize.  Plan
on being with us on November 8th in Paramus.

* WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT THE BLP THREAT:

On Saturday, August 9th Frank Fallon, N2FF attended a meeting of the
Ocean Monmouth ARC in Bradley Beach, NJ and spoke on a number of current
issues that the ARRL have been dealing with including the Broad Band
over Power Lines (BPL) issue.  Frank detailed the threat and gave
examples of what ARRL is doing to fight the FCC effort to change Part 15
regulations.

After N2FF’s talk a motion was made by Ron Oleander, WA2HZT, OMARC
President regarding an OMARC donation in the sum of $150.00 to the ARRL
Spectrum Defense Fund specifically for the BPL fight that was
unanimously approved by all the club members present.   After the
meeting members gave N2FF a tour of the Diana Site where the first moon
bounce signals were transmitted in the 1940’s and presented a check to
assist in the this effort against BPL.  See  N2FF thanked the club for
its generosity and encouraged all members who had the ability to also
consider a personal contribution. “It’s important that we get squarely
behind this effort,” he said.  “BPL has the ability to change the HF
bands as we currently know them by filling them with noise and at the
same time puts us in the position of having a great potential for
interfering with our neighbors who use the new technology.  It’s a
double whammy and a very bad idea.  I sure would like to shake a little
sense into Chairman Powell.”

Here is what one group in the division has to say about the problem.

Special Edition, Newsletter, Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service of
the Chathams  August 2, 2003

BPL potential serious threat to Amateur Radio

Broadband over Power Lines (BPL) is a very serious threat to Amateur
Radio. BPL is a proven technology to bring broadband Internet service to
homes and offices on AC power lines. It could very inexpensively replace
DSL, cable, WiFi and other broadband services. Sounds like a “natural”
for inexpensive broadband, right. But now get this . . .

BPL uses the spectrum from 2.0 MHz to 80 MHz for broadband signals on
the power lines going to homes and offices. This just misses our 160M
band but includes our, 80-to-75M, 40M, 30M, 20M, 17M, 15M, 12M, 10M, and
6M bands. In other words, all our prime long-distance HF bands. BPL
would likely kill all weak-signal contacts on these bands. What can you
do about this?

Learn more about BPL
The best source is the ARRL web site <http://www.arrl.org>. On the home
page click on either “Band threats,” or on the first item titled
“Attention all Amateurs.” In addition the site has the 120-page package
of comments the ARRL filed with the FCC by the original deadline of July
7 at http://www.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et03-104

File you own comments

The FCC just extended the deadline for comments to August 20. For
details go to
<http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2590A1.doc>. I
just managed to get my comments to the FCC by the original July 7
deadline.

Donate to the ARRL fund to fight BPL.

The goal is $300,000. By the end of July 3690 hams had donated $193,000,
which included mine. For details on donations go to
<https://www.arrl.org/forms/development/donations/bpl/>

Please do your part to fight this serious threat to our HF bands.

de O. Paul Schreiber, W2UH, w2uh@arrl.net    (A BIG THANKS, Paul, for
helping spread the word!)

Here is an email about Ed Hare’s efforts:

Gentlemen,

As I had mentioned previously, Ed Hare W1RFI and ARRL Lab Manager, was
stopping over in the Lehigh Valley, PA on Wednesday as part of a three
state sweep to monitor and collect data about BPL. I had the pleasure of
meeting and spending time with Mr. Hare on Wednesday morning and had the
opportunity to witness the effects BPL has on the Amateur HF bands.

On Tuesday night, my cell phone rang and when I answered, it was Mr.
Hare. He was in the Valley, in Dorneyville, and wanted to touch base
with me before our meeting the following morning. I was in West Chester
at the time visiting my son, but Mr. Hare had mentioned that he had
already swung through Emmaus that evening to make a preliminary
assessment of the area.

On Wednesday morning, I met Mr. Hare at the Comfort Suites in
Dorneyville.  After the introductions, during which he presented me a
copy of the “ARRL RFI Book”, we discussed a rough agenda, then loaded
into his well-used Subaru wagon replete with measuring equipment and a
Buddi-pole portable compact dipole strapped to the roof rack, and headed
off towards Emmaus. The area in Emmaus that is being used by PPL for the
BPL test is in the area of Pine St. just behind Emmaus High School and
the East Penn School District Administrative building. We drove around
to find a spot were we could setup to do some measurements. Mr. Hare had
selected a spot the previous evening that he thought might be a good
area to listen to and measure BPL’s radio signature. We parked outside a
residence and he began setting up his equipment.

Mr. Hare is using a very simple set-up in order to make an estimate of
the field strength of signals that he is interested in. Strapped to the
back seat of the Subaru was a wooden palette that contained a deep cycle
battery, an inverter, a step RF attenuator, an ICOM PCR-1000 receiver,
and his laptop computer running custom data acquisition and processing
software that Mr. Hare authored. As mentioned before, he used a
Buddi-Pole compact loaded dipole mounted in a tripod strapped to the
roof rack as the antenna. The

measurement process involves using the sound card in the laptop PC as an
audio voltmeter. It is first desirable to calibrate the system by first
measuring the noise generated by the soundcard and the receiver without
the antenna attached. The antenna is attached, and the attenuator is
adjusted until the desired signal is audible just above the noise floor.
The software is then used to sample the audio an that is processed to
determine the RMS value based on the 9 kHz bandwidth that the FCC
specifies for emissions from Part 15 devices in the HF band. A
calculation is then performed against this value taking into account the
parameters of the receiver system (radio, feed line, and antenna) to
determine the dbuV/M fields strength of the signal. It is a simple and
elegant system that Mr. Hare feels will produce the consistent and high
quality data that will be needed to address the Amateur Radio
communities about BPL to the FCC.

The real eye-opening part of the day was to listen to BPL in action on
the HF bands. Mr. Hare disconnected the PCR-1000 and replaced it with a
Kenwood TS-440 and we listened to several amateur bands. The type of BPL
used in the Emmaus area (there are several “flavors” which Mr. Hare
showed later) creates an impulse type noise on the bands. It sounds very
much like a Geiger counter. The noise generated is very broad banded and
can be heard continuously up-and-down the bands. It seemed to be
strongest on 21 MHz and faded below 5 MHz and a little above 24 MHz, but
this may have been due to our receive antenna not being optimized for
those frequencies. BPL created a consistent S5 to S7 noise level on the
bands. We listened for a while to 14.060 Mhz to hear what it would sound
like on a popular frequency.  Some faint CW stations in the background
could be heard, but the opinion was that they would be “un-copyable”
under the circumstances. We then got back in the car and began driving
around the area listening to the radio and the noise. As we got farther
away from the test area, the noise faded  dramatically. A few blocks
from our initial location, the noise level had dropped dramatically to
S1 to S2, the typical “quiet band” conditions.

We then drove to an area that had BPL, but had it’s electrical service
delivered through underground feeds. In this case, we pulled up outside
a residence that was owned by an engineer Mr. Hare had contacted about
BPL and who had an Amateur Radio operator living near him. In this case,
the noise generated was somewhat reduced, but still around the S5 level
outside the residence. It was clear from this example, that if you were
a ham living next door to this person, your operating conditions would
be greatly compromised.

Later, we drove around again to attempt to find a “hot spot”. In the
areas that had BPL, it was interesting to note the changing profile of
the noise as we roved around the area. Every time we passed a utility
pole, the noise level peaked dramatically. We arrived at one area that
exhibited a significant increase over neighboring areas. This area
happened to be a pole that contained a BPL injection point. The noise
present at this location was unprecedented. On the Kenwood, I noted a
consistent S9 to S9+10 noise level. I tuned up to around 14.200 and
found a 5 call area station in QSO with CY9A. The five was copyable, but
CY9A was much weaker, and the noise would have rendered a QSO with the
station unmanageable.  Mr. Hare then disconnected the TS-440 and made
some field strength measurements. His measurements revealed field
strengths well in excess of FCC limits.

We then packed up and stopped for lunch. During lunch, we discussed the
ARRL ARIA project and BPL. Mr. Hare explained that while the aim of the
ARIA project is much broader than BPL, it will be instrumental in
gathering evidence to support the ARRL’s position on BPL. He also
touched on some ancillary issue regarding BPL. On of the interesting points regarded the
limits on conducted signals versus radiated signals from BPL. He
explained that some BPL systems are looking to use very high power
levels and that these levels could exceed the design limits of other
devices plugged into electrical outlets. Another point was that the FCC
mandated field strength levels were specified under certain conditions.
The vagaries of the various BPL schemes and implementations can provide
“wiggle room” for BPL implementers pass the FCC requirements while still
creating systems that will adversely affect amateur communications. As
Mr. Hare pointed out, an overhead electrical line is just a large
radiator of an arbitrary size.  The radiation pattern developed by such
a line could take the main lobe outside of the test measurement area,
but still present a significant problem for amateur radio signals.
Therefore, an integral part of the project is to gain “real world”
experience about the affects of BPL on amateur ommunications. Still
another question is how BPL will affect other users of the HF radio
spectrum. Right now, the Amateur Radio community is the only organized
response to BPL. Mr. Hare hopes that when the data he and others are
gathering is made public, other organizations will come on-board and
voice their concerns about BPL.

After lunch, we went out to the parking lot of the hotel and talked some
more. Mr. Hare showed me a video tape he had made of his visit to Briar
Cliff Manor, NY (near White Plains), another BPL test site. In that
video, he is shown driving around with the TS-440 tuned to the 20m
amateur frequencies. As he drives around the area, he tunes around the
band.  It can be heard clearly that on frequency after frequency, block
after block, the band is filled with extremely loud “birdies”. It almost
made the Emmaus experience seem bearable. The frightening thing about
what I saw was that the situation will only get worse. The interference
that I heard in Emmaus is directly related to the amount of internet
activity. As more and more users come on-line, the crackling of the
“Geiger counter” will get more and more persistent. We saw BPL in the
day at low usage levels. I can only imagine what it might be like at
peak usage hours.

All-in-all, it was on of the most enlightening experiences I have ever
had. I am extremely thankful to Mr. Hare for inviting me along. I hope
that in the near future, I can organize my material for the purposes of
making a presentation to the DLARC and possibly the LARC.

If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact
me. Thank you for your time.

Regards,
Joel M. Gilly
AKrion, LLC.

If you are interested in reading all or part of ARRL’s 120 page comments
filled with the FCC on this issue check
http://www.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et03-104/

See also http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/08/08/2/?nc1  for some
of Ed’s video.

* FIELD DAY COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS

If you want to have the world see you 2003 Field Day comments and
pictures visit
http://www.arrl.org/contests/soapbox/editsoap.html?con_id=49
and click on ” Add your 2003 ARRL Field Day Soapbox comment.”

Rich Gelber saw a familiar call sign in the write up and sent the
following:

W2KN was the callsign of Buddy Robins, who was a friend of Bill Hellman,
John Burgio and others. I knew Buddy when he lived in Riverdale (the
Bronx) in the 1960’s and one of his sons was a classmate of mine
(Buddy’s callsign at the time was W2JKN).  Buddy was in the sweater
importing business and a member of the Explorer’s Club and had many
articles published in WorldRadio.  He was also a regular on the 3840
Sapphire Net

Much later, Buddy and his son Tony, who was not a ham, moved into a
building on West 67th Street that is literally next door to ABC.

About every 10 years, I would run into Buddy either on the street, or
stopped at a traffic light, or (once), on a DX trip. I once heard Buddy
operating on the French side of St. Maarten (FS) while I was on the
Dutch side (PJ7), so I went over to visit. (NA2M pointed out that Buddy
use to operate mobile while there and give out the FS and PJ7 while on
the road.) That was over 20 years ago. Once or twice I drove him to an
NJDXA meeting to see his friend Burgio and others.  But Buddy was around
80 by then and not doing real well. He died about 3-4 years ago. Buddy
owned a house on the Isle of Man, and had a GD0 callsign as well. I
think his other son, who lives in San Francisco, has a long-disused
Novice license, but didn’t do anything about the callsign.  (NA2M points
out that Buddy’s son in San Francisco now has Buddy’s original call –
W2JKN (ex KA2MLM – Donald Robins.)

We had some errors in the report of The Cherryville ARC site.  It
appears that we picked up some “old info” from the club website.  Sorry
about that! The prime movers this year were NJ3A, Charile, Club Pres.,
and W2CGX, ex club pres., and the food was handled by a group of people.
Thanks to W2GD for setting the record straight.

* Deadline Nears for Filing Ground Zero-Related Compensation Claims

Many former Ground-Zero volunteers who have developed health conditions
as a result of their efforts may not be aware that there is Federal and
New York State financial assistance available for their care, even care
that is long-term or chronic in nature. VOLUNTEERS, as well as
employees, are specifically included in these programs. Nobody should
have to be out-of-pocket, or exercise the claims procedures for their
private or employer-provided medical insurance as long as government
funds are available. Please give this information the widest possible
dissemination among the amateur radio volunteers. NYCOSH has already
done the heavy lifting as far as getting these programs set up; there’s
no good reason for anyone to suffer in silence.

de Rich Gelber, K2WR,  Assistant Director, Hudson Division

If you sustained an injury or illness as a result of working or
volunteering in the vicinity of Ground Zero in 2001, you may qualify for
medical care and/or compensation.

There are two distinct programs that offer compensation for injuries,
illnesses and ill-health resulting from work or volunteer work in the
vicinity of Ground Zero. One is a state program, New York State Workers’
Compensation. The other is a federal program, the September 11th Victim
Compensation Fund. Workers and volunteers who are eligible for
compensation from one program may also be eligible for compensation from
the other.

Anyone who may be eligible should consider the eligibility requirements
of both programs, as explained in a new NYCOSH fact-sheet posted on the
Internet, before deciding where to apply, or call NYCOSH for
assistance.  Anyone with the symptoms of an illness that was caused by
exposures in  the vicinity of Ground Zero may be eligible for
compensation. Many  medical conditions may result from World Trade
Center exposures,  including respiratory, nasal and sinus,
gastrointestinal and  psychological conditions.

For a comprehensive NYCOSH factsheet concerning both compensation
programs, visit http://www.nycosh.org/911WorkersCompGZ2.pdf

Jonathan Bennett, the  Public Affairs Director, New York Committee for
Occupational Safety and Health,  275 7th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001   jbennett@nycosh.org
Tel: 212-627-3900 ext. 14 Fax: 212-627-9812

Please visit our website: http://www.nycosh.org. Subscribe to our free biweekly Update on Safety and Health by sending
an  e-mail message to subupdate@nycosh.org

NYCOSH is a non-profit provider of occupational safety and health
training, advocacy and information (including technical assistance and
industrial hygiene consultation) to workers and unions throughout theNew York metropolitan area.  Our membership consists of more than 250
union organizations and 400 individuals: union members, health and safety activists, injured workers, healthcare workers, attorneys, public
health advocates, environmentalists and concerned citizens.

>   DRIVING PROBLEMS

From time to time we get reports of someone who gets into problems with
the local police in New York State over having a radio capable of
listening to public service frequencies or for violation of the new
hands   free law.  Although these reports are few and far between they
are bothering.  There is really little we can do to protect ourselves
from a “poorly informed local police-officer.”  But it would be wise to
have a copy of  your FCC license and both laws in your glove compartment
should the need arise to explain your legal activities to the local
police.  Be aware that while it is legal to have a ham radio rig which
can listen to public services (police) frequencies it is not at all
clear that you may posses a separate scanner for those frequencies nor a
radio capable of transmitting on those frequencies.

You can find PR Docket 91-36 in two different formats on the ARRL Web at
http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/additional.html. This
states that amateurs can possess a transceiver which has “extended
receive”, but not transmit capability. This docket does not appear on
the FCC Web page.   For the NYS law go to
http://www.senate.state.ny.us/  and select bills and laws and then
select VAH and scroll down to section 397 which is the specific law and
print a copy.  You will need to do the same for the hands free bill.

* SHOWING OFF HAM RADIO – Roseland ARC does it

Getting exposure for ham radio is vital to recruiting new hams of all
ages.  Here is a note from one division club.

Just a note to let you know about the Club’s recent activities with the
Roseland Recreation Department. The Club put on a demonstration of Ham
Radio before about 60 participants (ages 6-12) in the Borough’s summer
recreation program. We demonstrated repeater operations and had them
talk one of the members who was standing by at home on the repeater. We
also brought them into the shack in groups of about 10 and worked Hams
in Maryland and Ohio, letting them talk to hams and giving names, ages
and schools. Very exciting for them. Finally, we had many of them send
their names in CW, on a monitor. Lots of fun for all.     de Harvey,
W2YWC, President, Roseland (NJ) Amateur Radio Club

* QSL ADDRESSING THE EASY WAY

It’s nice to see someone you know well appear as a writer on the ARRL
web with an interesting tip on QSLing.  Long time LIDXA member Lou has
beaten me out in all too many RTTY pile ups.  As the blurb says:  Lou
Dietrich, N2TU, of Massapequa, New York, was first licensed in 1962 as
WN2RNW and then WA2RNW, but marriage, kids and a career in the
telecommunications industry curtailed his hamming. He got back into the
hobby in the early 1980s and later became an avid and expert DXer,
concentrating on Morse and RTTY operating.

See Lou’s article at
http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~blagger/the_duel.html

* ARRL/TAPR DIGITAL CONFERENCE IN SEPTEMBER IN HARTFORD

The 22nd annual ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference will take
place September 21-23 in Hartford, Connecticut. Guest speaker is Alex
Mendelsohn, AI2Q, senior technology editor at ChipCenter and the author
of “NASA, NORAD, Amateur Radio, and Me”. His article notes how amateurs
are the movers and shakers in many levels of industry, from top-level
management to engineers and technicians. Many on Long Island will
remember Alex from the early days of packet radio and the POLI
organization before Alex moved to Maine.  In the 1980’s Alex helped me
get a TAPR One board going to get on packet.

Introductory seminars will include “Intro to WSJT” by Del Schier, K1UHF;
“Intro to EchoLink and VoIP” by Jon Taylor, K1RFD; “Intro to PSK31” by
Steve Ford, WB8IMY; and “Intro to APRS” by Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU, who
also will moderate an APRS networking mini-seminar. Matt Ettus, N2MJI,
will lead a four-hour Software Defined Radio Sunday Seminar.  This might
warrant a trip to Hartford in September.

The program looks interesting –
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/07/30/2/?nc=1

You can find Alex’s article at
http://www.chipcenter.com/TestandMeasurement/ed024.html

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:

16 Aug 2003 + Ramapo Mountain ARC
Oakland, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey
http://www.qsl.net/rmarc
Contact:Bob Anderson, K2BJG
69 Page Drive
Oakland, NJ 07436
Phone: 201-337-6945
Fax: 973-962-6210
Email: rmarc@qsl.net

6 Sep 2003 + Saratoga County RACES Assn.
Ballston Spa, NY
Sect:Eastern New York
http://www.capital.net/~lake/
Contact:Darlene Lake, N2XQG
314 Louden Road, #84
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
Phone: 518-587-2385
Email: lake@capital.net

7 Sep 2003 + Long Island Mobile ARC
Bethpage, NY
Sect: New YorkCity-Long Island
http://www.limarc.org
Contact:Brian Gelber, WB2YMC
46 Forest Drive
Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 516-822-0673
Email: hamfest@limarc.org

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————-

Hudson Division Beacon – July 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
July 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

Items about the July ARRL Board meeting will appear in the August
issue.

* HISTORY MADE AT WRC 2003

Radio History is Made at WRC-03 with 7-MHz Realignment Compromise (July
3, 2003) — There’s good news from World Radiocommunication Conference
2003 (WRC-03) for 40-meter enthusiasts. In an 11th-hour compromise,
delegates to WRC-03, which wraps up officially July 4, agreed to move
broadcasters out of 7100 to 7200 kHz in Regions 1 and 3 to make room for
the Amateur Service.

The agreement eventually will mean a 200-kHz worldwide allocation at 40
meters. Although the change does not go into effect until 2009, that’s
considered speedy in International Telecommunication Union (ITU) terms.
Some of the timelines proposed during discussions on the 7 MHz agenda
item would have held off the changes until 2033! The WRC-03 action on 7
MHz makes no change in the exclusive US 40-meter allocation. US amateurs
will continue to enjoy the full 7000 to 7300 kHz band they now have.”

Comment:  We have had a number of dissenters and critics who said this
would never come about.  It is really great to see them be wrong.  This
is the first time that the broadcasting service has been moved for
another service.  It is also the result of many years of cooperation
among the IARU representatives worldwide.  There is also the possibility
that in 2007 the allocation for countries in regions 1 and 3 will be
increased further.  The item is on the agenda for that meeting.   de
N2FF

What to Do About Morse? Code Requirement Remains on the Books in US,
Canada (Jul 22, 2003) — World Radiocommunication Conference 2003
(WRC-03) made optional the requirement to prove the ability to send and
receive Morse signals to operate below 30 MHz. While a Morse code exam
element remains on the books in the US, Canada and elsewhere, some
countries already have moved to drop their Morse requirements. In the
US, however, Morse will not go away that easily, since the FCC appears
unlikely to act on its own motion to make that happen.  See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/07/22/1/?nc=1

The ARRL Directors will begin to develop a position on the issue at a
Strategic Planning meeting to be held in Saint Louis, MO in September.

HUDSON DIVISION AWARDS ANNOUNCED

Just before July 4th the ARRL Hudson Division Awards Committee met to
select the annual division award winners for 2003.

Each year, the Committee selects the Technical Achievement and Ham of
the Year winner as well as the Grand Ole Ham.

The Committee found all nominees qualified in their respective
categories.  The discussions could be characterized as quite animated
before the Committee reached its conclusions.

2003’s Technical Achievement Award winner is Len Signoretti Jr, N2LEN,
of Brooklyn, New York.  The specific achievement Len was recognized for
was the unique Echolink repeater/internet linking system he has
implemented, one of the first in the New York City area.  That system
was used to link repeaters across the world to form a special “9/11
commemorative net” on September 11th, 2002.  Over 1000 stations,
worldwide, connected to commemorate the victims and heros of 9/11
including ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP.  Continued work bringing
Echolink to Amateur Radio made Len the Committee’s choice for the
Technical Achievement Award.

The 2003 Grand Ole Ham is Jim Joyce, K2ZO, of Washington Township, New
Jersey.  A 30 year member of the Bergen Amateur Radio Club, Jim has
devoted most of his free time to the club and to making Amateur Radio
operators more knowledgeable in the hobby.  He has spent two decades as
an Elmer, founding the club’s “kit night” in which hams could learn the
basics of building electronic equipment, how to solder, or how to
troubleshoot and repair their own equipment.  Jim has been club Hamfest
chairman for a decade, a leader of the club’s yearly Field Day efforts
and always finds time to help others on a one-to-one basis.  Decades of
service to others made Jim a unanimous choice for Grand Ole Ham.

The 2003 Hudson Division Amateur of the Year is Bruce Lordi, N2XP, of
Flanders, New Jersey. A well rounded Amateur, Bruce has been described
as “Mr. Fixit”.  From HTs to Mobile equipment to repeaters, Bruce is
always ready to help hams with their technical problems.  Bruce gives
countless hours to helping hams and teaching others about technology.
He Elmers local Amateurs on the technology behind packet, PSK31, APRS,
HF, VHF and UHF techniques.

Bruce’s interest is not just in the technical side of radio.  He is very
involved in his club’s Field Day activities and works with his OEM,
keeping Flander’s EOC radio equipment up to state and federal standards.
The Committee felt, because of the wide range of his volunteer
activities, Bruce was a unanimous choice for Amateur of the Year.

The Hudson Division Awards Committee consists of two Assistant Directors
from each ARRL Section.  The Chairman is the Hudson Division Vice
Director, Steve Mendelsohn, W2ML.  This year’s Committee consisted of
NLI members Mel Granik, KS2G and Larry Lutzak, WA2CNV, ENY members Bob
Chamberlain, N2KBC and Dennis McAlpine, K2SX and NNJ members Joyce
Birmingham, KA2ANF and Mario Karcich, K2ZD.

There are many Amateurs worthy of recognition at the Division level.
Next year the submission process will be streamlined to make it easier
for such recognition to be given.  The Chairman would like to thank all
of those who submitted nominations.

-73- Steve Mendelsohn, W2ML, Chairman, 2003 ARRL Awards Committee

* HOLD NOV. 8th

The Hudson Division Awards Dinner will be held on November 8th in
Northern New Jersey at Biaggio’s.

* FIELD DAY TOUR AND COMMENTS

If you want to have the world see you 2003 Field Day comments and
pictures visit
http://www.arrl.org/contests/soapbox/editsoap.html?con_id=49 and click
on ” Add your 2003 ARRL Field Day Soapbox comment.”

A last minutes look for directions on a number of club web sites
revealed that most clubs did NOT have directions to their Field Day
sites available.  Pleased don’t take for granted that all those wishing
to come visit know where you are.  Both Bill Hudzik, W2UDT, NNJ SM and I
encountered the same problem: No site information and directions for a
number of clubs.  Think about the inactive ham or local resident who
knows of the club and wants to come visit and get those directions ready
for next year.

It was a little difficult this year to get to see many Field Day sites
because I was heavily involved with the Order of Boiled Owls at
Caumsette State Park on Lloyds Neck.  I missed a meeting and they made
me the Field Day chairman.  Seriously they did.  Nice guys!  So I did my
bit negotiating arrangements with a new park superintendent and getting
insurance for the first time.  The club has only 15 members and about
ten participate at FD in our 2A Commercial effort.  On Friday, remember
that hot afternoon, I was there with about five other Owls to set up
five masts for our wires.  A few years ago we cut back because of
manpower problems and stopped using beams.  By 5:30 we had all but one
mast in place.  When I came back at 7 AM Sunday morning after a 45
minute drive to the site (due North of Huntington) with bagels and lox
for breakfast all the towers were up and both stations manned. Our
90-year old cook K2AW, Frank Fix of “Silicon Alley” fame, was frying
eggs for all present.  Frank participated in the First Field Day in
1932.

In addition I brought with me my trusty Icom 706 and a fan dipole for 10
and 6 meters that I bring to England when I visit my daughter’s and her
family.  Les, W2LK, helped me get it up to the top of one of the 20 foot
masts and run the coax into an operating position.  Using paper logging
I managed about 35 QSOs to stations in NLI, EMA, WPA, NNJ and ENY in a
period of about two hours.  N2GA worked a few more on cw but we shut
down due to a phase noise problem interfering with operation on 20 and
15. ( If anyone has a cheap fix for the problem let me know .
Commercial bandpass filters cost over $300.) When FD ended we had about
half the number of QSOs we had last year when we came in number one USA
in our category.  Band conditions were not good this year, but anyone
who was at Field Day knows that propagation conditions were poor this
year.  Nevertheless the Owls had a great HOOT and a big meal after take
down.  These guys are pretty smart birds and make anyone who eats work
first.

The Tour:  At the last minute I decided to visit a few Field Day sites.
My wife, Kathleen, and our blind twelve year old pug dog, Izzy, went
along for the ride.

The first stop was YARK – the Yonkers ARC at Redmond Field, Yonkers.
You really need a map to get there.  Arriving about 11 AM I was in time
to watch club members assembly a new two element 40 meter beam led by
Richard Kautz, KC2HZW and his able crew.  I would love to have that at
my home QTH as we head into the low spot in the eleven year cycle.  Post
FD reports indicate the beam worked very well. Very friendly folks at
YARK especially W2CZ, Paul Maytan, AC2T, Bob Lisnak, AC2G, and  Dan
Calabrese, AA2HX,  was ready with a much appreciated cup of coffee.  Too
bad Emily was not able to make it to Field Day this year but hope she
will be back next year.

From there we headed off to NNJ for a visit to the 10-70 Repeater
Association site and our good friends there.  We arrived just as they
broke for lunch at about noon.  Good planning on our part as they had a
very nice lunch laid on at the ski lodge at the Campgaw Ski Area site.
Special thanks to Paul Beshlian KC2CJW and Joyce Birmingham, KA2ANF and
the three young ladies we had lunch with: Amanda Beshlian, Tracey
Sonnenwald, and Nicole Joyce.

When we left at about one we headed for GSARA but never got there.  Our
intentions were good but we made the mistake of taking the Garden State
parking lot rather than Route 287.  We “bailed” at route 202 and headed
for WJDXG.  Apologies to Bob Buus, Jack Keating  and Bruce McLeod,
K2QXW, who had sent directions. It looked like we would not make it to
Tatum Park by 6 PM.

We had a nice visit with Larry Puccio, K2QDY, Paul Franson W2LE, Douglas
Rue W2EN and Marty Grozinski, W2CG  and others at the West Jersey DX
Group site at a 4 H location off route 202.  Larry, who was a classmate
of mine in high school had Matt Rozea, KC2IGE, his teen-age grandson
from Long Island visiting and operating.  Matt is an Extra and quite a
good cw operator.  We liked the ncie air-conditioned van the group used.
Also on hand were: Chuck Fainsbert KC2NB, Vito Mistretta N2VM, Peter
Pellack NO2R, Steve Silberman W2KN, and Tony Ricicki N2VRK Their GOTA
station was going full blast with three operators when we left.

The Cherryville ARC, which always has a very impressive antenna set up,
had a very nice GOTA station operating right next to the local library
with its own tower and antennas.  This was the most impressive GOTA
station we have seen so far.  Cherryville gave each participant who made
a GOTA contact an attractive certificate.  Smart move.  The Cherryville
ARC is very organized. Everything including stoves and refrigerators are
stored in an 18 wheel trailer that is brought out to the site for Field
Day and then repacked and ready for next year or a big emergency. Duncan
MacRae, KE2HG and Rob France, N3QDC had quite an operation going there.
Charlie Kosman WB2NQVand his assistants Lisa France and Elaine Kita
N3ODB do put together a wonderful meal for the huge gang.

We had a very pleasant visit with lots of friendly folk and fine food.
Thanks again Cherryville.

The trip home was three hours long due to a big accident stalling
traffic on Staten Island.  Our dog Izzy slept all through the next
day.

I hope everyone learned something and had a good time at Field Day!

* DXCC LIST DEADLINE APPROACHES

The deadline for submitting applications for the 2003 DXCC Annual List
is rapidly approaching. Applications must be postmarked September 30,
2003.  Get those cards in on time!

* HOMELAND SECURITY HIGHLIGHTS METROPLEX FIELD DAY EXERCISE

The Metroplex Amateur Radio Club, based in Fort Lee, NJ, participated in
this year’s American Radio Relay League Field Day, on June 28 and 29.
The Metroplex group operated an “F” Class Station, transmitting from the
Ramsey Office of Emergency Management’s Radio Room.  This is the first
year that the ARRL has instituted an “F” Class Station, as part of its
commitment to Homeland Security and the Community Citizen Corps.

“For the past 75 years, all ham radio clubs have been encouraged to
conduct Field Day, outside, with emergency power and temporary
antennas,” stated Tom Bennett, N2IMG, President of MARC, “But this year
the emphasis was placed on working in cooperation with local OEM
agencies.  Many dignitaries were on-hand to kick-off the national
program.”

The Metroplex Amateur Radio operators utilized the Emergency Operations
Center, at the Ramsey Municipal Building. Additional radios and antennas
were installed for the event.   Michael Adams, WA2MWT, is the Ramsey
Emergency Management Coordinator as well as the Public and Governmental
Relations Officers with MARC.

“Ham operators continued the tradition of providing emergency
communications after Tropical Storm Floyd and the World Trade Center
Attacks,” Adams commented, “It is only logical that an emphasis should
be placed on conducting drills from EOC’s.”

Over a twenty-four hour period, local Amateurs made contact with other
hams from all over the United States.  Metroplex hams working under
Bennett’s supervision included Armand Lucchesi, John Ludewig and Dominic
Benjamin.

Bergen County Executive Dennis McNerney issued a proclamation
recognizing M.A.R.C.’s participation:  “I hereby recognize the Metroplex
Amateur Radio Club for their emergency communications efforts and
proclaim June 28 and 29 ARRL Field Day in Bergen County.”

The Metroplex Amateur Radio Club has been designated, through formal
agreement, as the back-up repeater for the Bergen Emergency
Communications Association, The Bergen-Passaic SkyWarn Spotter Program
of the National Weather Service, and the Ramsey Office of Emergency
Management.

The group meets at the Red Oak Diner, in Fort Lee, every Saturday
afternoon, from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM.   They also maintain a website:
www.metroplex.org/   “Please feel free to stop by the Red Oak Diner or
contact us through our website,” Bennett added, “We will be happy to
discuss all aspects of Amateur Radio, ranging from the recreational to
the full emergency capabilities.”
De Michael Adams, 201-825-3400, ext.420 Wa2mwt@arrl.net

>  FEMA AND ARRL PARTNER IN PREPAREDNESS THROUGH CITIZEN CORPS

Washington, DC — Michael D. Brown, Under Secretary of Homeland Security
for Emergency Preparedness and Response, today announced an official
affiliation between the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) and President
Bush’s Citizen Corps initiative. At the ARRL National Conference,
sponsored by “Ham-Com,” celebrating its 25th anniversary in Arlington,
Texas, an affiliate partnership was signed between ARRL and Citizen
Corps. The signed partnership will raise public awareness about the use
of Amateur Radio as a public safety resource, provide training and
accreditation for Amateur Radio Emergency Communications, as well as
assist Citizen Corps Councils with public education, training and
volunteer service opportunities that support first responders, disaster
relief organizations, and community safety efforts.    For more details
see http://www.fema.gov/nwz03/nwz03_138.shtm from “FEMA News”

A lead up to the event story can be seen at
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/06/4/?nc=1

NEWINGTON, CT, Jun 24, 2003–ARRL now is an official affiliate program
of Citizen Corps, an initiative within the Department of Homeland
Security to enhance public preparedness and safety. ARRL President Jim
Haynie, W5JBP, signed the formal Statement of Affiliation between DHS
and ARRL during the ARRL 2003 National Convention June 21. Chief
Operating Officer of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate
(FEMA) Ron Castleman represented Under Secretary for Emergency
Preparedness and Response Michael D. Brown at the signing. Citizen Corps
Liaison to the White House Liz DiGregorio called ham radio operators the
“first of the first responders.”     ARRL Web Page

See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/24/2/?nc=1 for more details
and pictures.

* ARRL FILES ON “BROADBAND OVER POWER LINE”  INTERFERENCE THREAT

“BPL is a Pandora’s Box of Unprecedented Proportions,” ARRL Tells FCC
(Jul 8, 2003) — Citing the potential for interference to and from
Amateur Radio, the ARRL has called on the FCC to “take no steps” to
permit Broadband over Power Line (BPL)–a form of power line carrier
(PLC) technology. The League has filed a 120-page response–including
studies–in response to the FCC’s BPL Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in ET
Docket 03-104, published May 23. The NOI asking how the FCC should
regulate the delivery of broadband services to homes and businesses
using electrical wiring to conduct high-speed digital signals attracted
some 1900 comments–many from the amateur community–by the July 7
comment deadline.  de ARRL Web site     For more details and a copy of
the comments see http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/07/08/1/?nc=1

Some of you had an opportunity to hear Ed Hare, W1RFI, talk about this
threat at the Sussex Hamfest.  Ed had an audience of over 50 hams at the
event.  Thanks to the Sussex folks for inviting Ed to speak.  It was, as
always a great hamfest with good weather.

* H.R.713 GAINS ADDITIONAL SPONSORS – OUR SPECTRUM PROTECTION BILL

Please read the letter “Pressing Our Case With Congress” from W4LTX in
the August QST on page 24.  Have you let your congressional
representative know how you feel about this bill?  Although the bill now
has 44 cosponsors it could use many more.  Have you done your bit?

Florida Republican Rep Michael Bilirakis filed the House version of the
bill, HR 713, on February 12. The measure’s most recent cosponsors
include US representatives JD Hayworth (R-AZ), Paul Gillmor (R-OH), Greg
Walden, WB7OCE, (R-OR), Rick Boucher (D-VA), John M. Spratt Jr (D-SC) ,
Sherwood L. Boehlert (R-NY), Robert Wexler (D-FL), Mike McIntyre (D-NC),
Ken Calvert, (R-CA), Joe Wilson (R-SC), John T. Doolittle (R-CA), Neil
Abercrombie (D-HI) and Frank Pallone Jr (D-NJ).

Hudson Division Co Sponsors are:  Rep McNulty, Michael R. – 2/27/2003
[NY-21] Rep Boehlert, Sherwood L. – 6/17/2003 [NY-24] Rep Garrett, Scott
– 3/26/2003 [NJ-5] Rep Israel, Steve – 5/20/2003 [NY-2]   See
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/07/08/4/?nc=1 for more details

* Long Island amateur is part of tall ship’s crew –

QST “YL News” Editor Diane Ortiz, K2DO, of Amityville, New York was
among the crew members onboard the Jeanie Johnston, when the tall ship
sailed into New York Harbor July 3.  NYC Fire Department boats were on
hand to send up streams of colored water and many hoots as a welcome.
Also on hand to meet her were her husband N2GA, George Tranos, NLI SM
and N2FF, Frank Fallon, Hudson Division Director.  Ortiz, a member and
former chairperson of the ARRL Public Relations Committee, is Public
Information Coordinator for the ARRL New York City-Long Island Section
as well as a Public Information Officer. The three-masted, 123-foot
(LOA) barque is a replica of one of the so-called “famine ships” that
brought some 3000 Irish immigrants to the US during the 19th century’s
potato famine.  Ortiz operated Amateur Radio during the three-day sail
from Bristol, Pennsylvania, to the North Cove Marina off Battery Park
City in lower Manhattan. Ortiz is president of the Long Island Mobile
Amateur Radio Club (LIMARC) in Levittown. Her husband is ARRL New York
City-Long Island Section Manager George Tranos, N2GA. The Jeanie
Johnston will remain in port at Lower Manhattan until July 14, when it
departs for Port Jefferson on Long Island. For more information, visit
the Jeanie Johnston Web page at
http://www.jeaniejohnston.com/home.asp?id=1

N2FF along with his wife had visited the Jeanie Johnston in
Blennerville, Co Kerry, Ireland in 1999 while it was being built.
Blennerville is only a few miles from where his wife’s parents were
born.  Fallon said, “I have been waiting for five years to see the
Jeanie Johnston in New York.  I never expected to know any of the crew
members; much less the only one of the crew with no Irish connections
and also to have worked that crew member on 40 meter phone at sea.  It’s
another of those great ham radio stories.”

> OMARC 2003 Technician Theory, Morse Code classes and VE Testing
schedule

OMARC sponsored Amateur Radio Technician theory classes will again
commence beginning Tuesday, September 16th 2003 at 6:00pm with
orientation at the Diana site. These classes will run through November
with completion in time for the December VE test.

All classes and VE Testing will be held at the InfoAge Center OMARC
Diana site, building 9116 on Marconi Road, Wall Township, Monmouth
County, New Jersey.

For directions to the site visit: http://www.qsl.net/n2mo

All classes will be begin promptly each Tuesday night during the
duration of the course.

Morse Code classes will begin Tuesday, September 30th 2003 at 6:30p.m.

The course outline will be Technician Class studies with the option of
Morse Code classes currently provided. Study materials required will be
the latest copy of the ARRL “Now You’re Talking” which are available
direct from the ARRL or OMARC.

For additional details on the classes and to sign up in advance please
contact Larry, KB2RIS at kb2ris@wmconnect.com or his lovely XYL, Donna,
KC2GKQ at djwilkins59@wmconnect.com

VE Schedule: VE test sessions will be held at the Diana site every other
month during 2003 and 2004 per the schedule below. These VE sessions
will be open to the general public and will begin promptly at 10:00a.m.
at the Diana site.

All applicants should arrive by at least 9:45am to complete paper work.
Applicants with special requirements are asked to make contact prior to
the VE session.

August 2nd, 2003, October 4th, 2003 and December 6th, 2003

* A REPORT ON NYC ARES  from Charles J. Hargrove – N2NOV

NYC ARES has been in existence since 1994. It has taken many years of
hard work, training and meetings with our served agencies to get just
this far. While the 1990’s were a bleak period for NYC ARES as far as
acceptance as a dedicated volunteer group, the post-Y2K era has seen
some growth and changes. We entered late 1999 with 125 members on the
citywide roster, with many who did not check into the weekly net, attend
the one or two Citywide meetings or even participate in the singular
Citywide public service event (369 Parade).

Today, NYC ARES is a more vibrant group with 76 members on a roster that
has over 50% participation instead of the previous 15-20%. We now
participate in 15 events per year with over 1,600 man-hours! Our weekly
nets have over 30 check-ins each. 47 have completed their Red Cross DRPG
modules, 44 have taken the Skywarn certification and 22 have further
studied FEMA Independent Study courses to advance to RACES status.

Here is the breakdown of membership by Boro:
Manhattan 15,  Bronx 6,  Queens 15,  Brooklyn 25,  Staten Island 15

The breakdown of license classes of our members are:
Tech 29,  Plus 5,  General 18,  Advanced 3,  Extra 21

Our public service event venues are scattered across the City:
Manhattan 5 (plus 1 shared with Brooklyn)
Bronx 0
Queens 1 (plus 1 shared with Brooklyn)
Brooklyn 2 (1 shared with Manhattan; 1 shared with Queens)
Staten Island 6 (of which 4 originated from the 2 local clubs)
Citywide 1 (NYC Marathon not included)

They are also scattered across the calendar:
April (3), May (3), June (3), July (1), Sept (2), Oct (2), Dec (1)

The types of events are varied:
Walks – 4
Races – 6
Bikes – 3
Water – 1
Other – 1

The average event utilizes the services of 16 operators for 6.7 hours.

Obviously, not all 76 members are pulling their weight. 54 members have
done a least 1 event so far this year. Two have done 9 of the so far 10
events for a total of 62 hours each! With 5 more events for the rest of
the year, your EC hopes to see better participation from those who have
only done one or two this Spring.

The only things that will help NYC ARES to grow and thrive are
recruitment of more dedicated amateur radio operators and the commitment
to learn and practice what they are taught. Our practice keeps us ready
for any emergency while at the same time gives something back to our
communities.  At the same time, our exposure to the public during these
events can only be a positive thing!

73
Charles J. Hargrove – N2NOV/NNN0BCE (Navy MARS)
NYC ARES District Emergency Coord./RACES Radio Officer/Skywarn Coord.
NYDXA SWL & Scanner Net Wed. @ 9PM 147.000/136.5 PL\

>  NORTH AMERICA DX ASSOCIATION

NA2DX is the callsign of the JCDXA (Jersey Coast DX Association).  A
chapter of the NADXA (North America DX Assoc.) (WR2DX) All DXers are
welcome, especially those with DXCC, CQDX or WorldRadio 100 Nations
Awards. JCDXA Meets on the fourth (4th) Monday night of every month at
the Cobblestone Diner Restaurant Rt.35 & Clinton St. just south of Fort
Monmouth, NJ. at 7:30 PM…. Please feel welcome to come.

JCDXA was formed May, 2000 with roughly 12 hams interested in DX, DX’ing
and Contesting. We are of optimistic hope that there are DX’ers within
the area (Central New Jersey) who would like to add their input and
experience to our DX Assoc. and become a part of our group.

The Association in conjuction with the North America DX Association
(NADXA), sponsors a Bus Trip to the Dayton Hamvention in Ohio every
year.  May 13 – 16, 2004 will be the 14th year of doing this and all
Hams are welcome, its great for the NY, NJ and Eastern PA. Hams. send us
an e-mail na2dx@juno.com or nadxa@juno.com or kc2q@arrl.com.

The Officers for the year 2003 are: President: KC2Q, Mike DiPersio, Vice
Pres.: KG2NV, Don Pingitore, Secretary: KC2KWT, Joan Burns, Treasurer:
AB2N, Arnold Peterson.

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:

16 Aug 2003 + Ramapo Mountain ARC
Oakland, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey
http://www.qsl.net/rmarc
Contact:Bob Anderson, K2BJG
69 Page Drive
Oakland, NJ 07436
Phone: 201-337-6945
Fax: 973-962-6210
Email: rmarc@qsl.net

6 Sep 2003 + Saratoga County RACES Assn.
Ballston Spa, NY
Sect:Eastern New York
http://www.capital.net/~lake/
Contact:Darlene Lake, N2XQG
314 Louden Road, #84
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
Phone: 518-587-2385
Email: lake@capital.net

7 Sep 2003 + Long Island Mobile ARC
Bethpage, NY
Sect: New YorkCity-Long Island
http://www.limarc.org
Contact:Brian Gelber, WB2YMC
46 Forest Drive
Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 516-822-0673
Email: hamfest@limarc.org

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————-

Hudson Division Beacon – June 2003

ARRL Hudson Division
June 2003
Hudson Division Beacon – e-mail edition
By Frank Fallon, N2FF, Director, Hudson Division, ARRL
30 East Williston Avenue, East Williston, NY 11596
516) 746-7652
n2ff@arrl.org
Hudson Division Home Page – http://www.hudson.arrl.org

ARRL Members

Please continue to spread the word to others who may wish to receive
this information that they will need to access the ARRL members only web
site.  After becoming a member they must edit their profile and elect to
receive bulletins from the Section Manager and Director.  If you are
already a member on the ARRL site (http://www.arrl.org) from the
“Members Only” box click on “members data page” and then under email
notification options set “Division/Section notices” to YES.  You will
receive the next bulletin sent.  Past Bulletins are available at
http://www.hudson.arrl.org

> SCAM WARNING *****

I had the following e-mail from QST Publisher, Mark Wilson, K1RO:
Several members have called this week to say that they have received
telephone solicitations to renew their “ham radio magazine subscription”
before a price increase. One caller said he receives several magazines
and asked if it was QST and was told “yes.” The solicitor then attempted
to get name, address and credit card info.

We have published a story on the Web site warning members that such
calls are not legitimate and asking anyone who receives such a call to
let us know in as much detail as possible.

>  FIELD DAY THIS WEEKEND

I hope you all have a GREAT Field Day although the long range weather
forecast is showing rain and lightening.  We have had enough of that
stuff.  I’ll be with the Boiled Owls – KW2O – on NLI.  Please work our
2A commercial group.

Some of you I am sure had a smile of the headlines associated with the
rock concert event in Calverton which said, “Field Day Cancelled.”
Despite threats of rain etc. we will be there having a good time.

> HOLD NOV. 8th

The Hudson Division Awards Dinner will be held on November 8th in
Northern New Jersey at Biaggio’s.

>  FEMA AND ARRL PARTNER IN PREPAREDNESS THROUGH CITIZEN CORPS

Washington, DC — Michael D. Brown, Under Secretary of Homeland Security
for Emergency Preparedness and Response, today announced an official
affiliation between the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) and President
Bush’s Citizen Corps initiative. At the ARRL National Conference,
sponsored by “Ham-Com,” celebrating its 25th anniversary in Arlington,
Texas, an affiliate partnership was signed between ARRL and Citizen
Corps. The signed partnership will raise public awareness about the use
of Amateur Radio as a public safety resource, provide training and
accreditation for Amateur Radio Emergency Communications, as well as
assist Citizen Corps Councils with public education, training and
volunteer service opportunities that support first responders, disaster
relief organizations, and community safety efforts.    For more details
see http://www.fema.gov/nwz03/nwz03_138.shtm   from “FEMA News”

A lead up to the event story can be seen at
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/06/4/?nc=1

NEWINGTON, CT, Jun 24, 2003–ARRL now is an official affiliate program
of Citizen Corps, an initiative within the Department of Homeland
Security to enhance public preparedness and safety. ARRL President Jim
Haynie, W5JBP, signed the formal Statement of Affiliation between DHS
and ARRL during the ARRL 2003 National Convention June 21. Chief
Operating Officer of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate
(FEMA) Ron Castleman represented Under Secretary for Emergency
Preparedness and Response Michael D. Brown at the signing. Citizen Corps
Liaison to the White House Liz DiGregorio called ham radio operators the
“first of the first responders.”     ARRL Web Page

See http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/24/2/?nc=1 for more details
and pictures.

> New 60-Meter Band to Become Available July 3!

NEWINGTON, CT, Jun 3, 2003–The new five-channel 60-meter amateur
allocation becomes available to US Amateur Radio operators at midnight
local time on July 3.

ARRL has posted a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) concerning 5
MHz operation on the ARRL Web site,
www.arrl.org/fandes/field/regulations/faq.html#sixty .

The new band will be a secondary allocation–federal government users
are primary–and the first on which the only permitted mode will be
upper-sideband (USB) phone (emission type 2K8J3E). The FCC last month
announced it would grant hams access five discrete 2.8-kHz-wide channels
in the vicinity of 5 MHz instead of the 150 kHz-wide band ARRL had
requested–and which the FCC initially proposed more than a year ago.
The ARRL remains optimistic that Amateur Radio eventually may be able to
enjoy a band segment with multiple mode privileges at 60 meters, but
ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, has said that in the meantime hams will
have to be on their best behavior when taking advantage of the limited
channelized allocation.

“In terms of Amateur Radio spectrum, we usually say, ‘Use it or lose
it,'” he said. “The watchword for 60-meter operators should be, ‘Misuse
it and lose it.'” Sumner has predicted that, over time, amateurs can and
will “develop a record of disciplined, responsible use of the five
channels in the public interest that will justify another look at these
rather severe initial restrictions.”

The FCC has granted amateurs 5332, 5348, 5368, 5373 and 5405 kHz–the
last channel common to the amateur experimental operation under way in
the United Kingdom. The channels will be available to General and higher
class licensees. In terms of day-to-day operation, use of the new band
is expected to resemble the sort of channel sharing typical on local
repeaters.

The NTIA selected the channels the FCC authorized to minimize the
possibility of interference to federal government users. The NTIA also
dictated the use of USB only as an interoperability convenience, so that
federal government users–who also use only USB–could readily identify
amateur stations if necessary.

ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, says hams hoping to operate on
the new allocation need to be very careful if they’re considering
modifying their current transceiver or transmitter. The ARRL recommends
that members check with the manufacturer of their equipment regarding
specific modification information. Some modifications not only might
void the warranty on a piece of equipment but could affect or alter a
transmitter’s operation in unpredictable ways.

“Hams need to be sure that any modifications put them right on the
desired channel,” Hare said. The FCC, following the lead of the NTIA,
has said that the channel frequencies in the R&O are all “channel-center
frequencies.”

“Most hams are used to just having to think about band edges, so on
other bands, if a mod were a bit ‘off,’ all operators would need to
ensure is that they are not transmitting outside the band.” But, Hare
recommended, on 5 MHz, amateurs must be within “a few tens of Hertz” of
suppressed-carrier accuracy, and, he points out, amateurs have a mandate
not to have any of signal occupy spectrum outside the assigned 2.8 kHz
channels. Additionally, hams need to make sure before they go on the air
on 60 meters that any mods they’ve made do not have unintended
consequences, such as spurious emissions on non-amateur frequencies.

The NTIA advised in a letter to the FCC Office of Engineering and
Technology (OET) that users of 60 meters should set their carrier
frequency 1.5 kHz lower than the channel center frequency, according to
this NTIA chart:

Channel Center           Amateur Tuning Frequency
5332 kHz               5330.5 kHz
5348 kHz               5346.5 kHz
5368 kHz               5366.5 kHz
5373 kHz               5371.5 kHz
5405 kHz common US/UK) 5403.5 kHz

Noting that high-frequency audio response can vary considerably from
radio to radio, Hare has suggested a more conservative approach. He
suggests restricting audio bandwidth to 200 Hz on the low end, and 2800
Hz on the high end–for a total bandwidth of 2.6 kHz. Hare notes that
some transmitters that the Lab has looked at are capable of bandwidths
of 3.0 kHz or greater.

In its letter to the FCC, the NTIA also stipulated that radiated power
should not exceed “the equivalent of 50 W PEP transmitter output power
into an antenna with a gain of 0 dBd.” The FCC R&O set the requirement
at 50 W ERP and said it would consider a typical half-wave dipole to
exhibit no gain.

Hare said that amateurs’ willingness to adhere to the channel-bandwidth
and power constraints imposed on 60 meters will be an important factor
in ham radio’s use of this band–now and in the future.

> BROADBAND OVER POWER LINE” POSES HF INTERFERENCE THREAT

(This could be a bigger threat than the “Little Leo” proposals of as few
years back.  While “Little Leo’s” would have meant the possible loss of
one band, the “BPL” proposal may mean a much higher noise level on a
number of our bands in the 2 to 80 MHZ range.   It may also put us in
conflict with some of our neighbors who would be using these devices.
It appears that there is a huge potential for two way interference here.
See http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/06/19/2/?nc=1  de N2FF)

The FCC soon will invite public comment on the concept of using existing
electrical power lines to deliver Internet and broadband service to
homes and offices. The Commission initiated a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in
ET Docket 03-104 when it met April 23. What the FCC calls “Broadband
over Power Line” (BPL) is a form of carrier-current technology typically
known as power line communication (PLC). Whatever its name, the
technology is raising serious interference concerns within the Amateur
Radio community, since BPL would apply high-frequency RF to parts of the
power grid. One aspect of the NOI is to gather information on potential
interference effects on authorized spectrum users.

“Entire communities will be affected, so every amateur in that community
could have part of the radiating system ‘next door’ on the power wiring
on his or her street,” cautioned ARRL Lab Supervisor Ed Hare, W1RFI.
Hare chairs the PLC Work Group of the IEEE C63 Accredited Standards
Committee on Electromagnetic Compatibility http://c63.ieee.org/.

So-called “access BPL” would use medium-voltage (1 kV to 40 kV) power
lines to deliver Internet and broadband applications. Hare says access
BPL is likely to be a more significant interference source than
in-building PLC technology “because overhead electrical wiring is a much
better antenna than the electrical wiring within a building.”

ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, editorialized on the subject of PLC in “It
Seems to Us . . .” in the October issue of 2002 QST. “Is it possible to
do power line communications without causing interference to
over-the-air communications?” Sumner asked. “Count us among the
skeptics. What may be a fine transmission line at 60 Hz looks more like
an antenna at HF.” Hare said his own computer analyses of interference
potential from access BPL/PLC suggest “a significant increase in noise
levels” from deployed systems.

Ed Hare and others on staff have done a remarkable job of pulling
together in one place information that puts the lie to industry claims
that “no interference has been reported” from PLC/PLT/BPL tests to
date.

This link takes you to the news story posted on ARRL Web today:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/04/30/2/?nc=1

This link takes you to an introduction to the detailed information:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/04/30/2/more.html

This link takes you directly to the detailed information:
http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/

More is at the FCC’s website at:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-233537A1.doc
and
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-100A1.doc
(CGC Communicator)

> President Haynie Testifies on Behalf of Amateur Radio Spectrum
Protection Act

ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, testified June 11 on Capitol Hill on
behalf of the Spectrum Protection Act of 2003, HR 713. The ARRL
initiative would require the FCC to provide “equivalent replacement
spectrum” to Amateur Radio if the FCC reallocates primary amateur
frequencies, reduces any secondary amateur allocations, or makes
additional allocations within such bands that would substantially reduce
their utility to amateurs. Haynie was the last of 11 scheduled witnesses
to speak during the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet
hearing, “The Spectrum Needs of Our Nation’s First Responders.”

Check the story on the ARRL web site and also find an audio link which
will enable you to listen to Jim’s testimony.  You will be impressed.
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/11/101/?nc=1

> A VERY BAD IDEA IN NJ ASSEMBLY

If you want to stop this bad idea contact your New Jersey Assemblyman.
A2798 is a proposed Bill which attempts to define a distracted driver
who may be charged with reckless, careless or unsafe driving.  It seeks
to amend existing statutes on reckless and careless driving with the
following paragraph: “When so warranted, a law enforcement officer may
charge a person with a violation of the provisions of this section if
that person, while operating a motor vehicle, engages in distracting
behavior including but not limited to the use of communications
technology such as wireless telephones, pagers, facsimile machines,
locator devices, AM/FM radios, compact disc players, audio cassette
players, video players, citizens band radios, and dispatch radios;
engaging in personal grooming, consuming food or beverages; reading; or
tending to unsecured pets.”

This NOT ABOUT HAM RADIO.   The State already has statues in effect that
define reckless and careless driving. If you feel strongly about this
proposed Bill PLEASE write your State Representative and/or the sponsors
and let them know your feelings.  The Bill can be found at:
www.state.nj.us   Click on NJ Legislative, go to “find Bills” and follow
the directions. E-mail links are there to the sponsors.

Please remember, legislators listen to their constituents if they want
to get re-elected.     73, Bill Hudzik, W2UDT SM NNJ

> NEW YORK LEGISLATIVE SESSION ……

Thanks for your support, but we were not successful.  But we will, with
your support, be back at it again next year.  We have a very difficult
project here.  Yes, other states have been able to get bills enacted,
but please be aware that very few of them talk about the issue of
height.  Our bills in New York and New Jersey deal with the issue of
height.  We remain committed to getting a bill in both states that
specifies a height below which local government may not regulate.

Despite our letter writing efforts and visits to Albany our antenna
bills were not voted on in the legislature this year.  W2GLA and I made
two visits to Albany in June during the last two weeks of the
legislature to talk to the sponsors and key members of Speaker Silver’s
staff.  The legislature was very distracted this year with other issues
and problems – overriding the governor’s veto of the budget, brownfields
legislation, and Rockefella drug laws  – and finally the arrest of a key
aide to Speaker Silver on rape charges only ten days before the session
ended. The interesting sidelight here is the individual arrested is
someone we had been dealing with on the telephone and that W2GLA and I
were in the building when he was arrested.  In the final days new staff
people were brought in to fill his place but Silver’s office never
really caught up and our bill never came to the floor.  Knowing that the
bill was not going to pass in the Assembly the senate sponsor, Dale
Volker, never brought our bill to the floor.  It would have been a waste
of time and we understood his action.

It is frustrating but not surprising that our legislation did not get
the attention it needed.  Should the legislature go back into session
later in the year they will not deal with our bill.  They will deal only
with specific legislation.  We are disappointed but not discouraged.

We had letters from two US Congressional representatives supporting our
bill – Congressman Steve Israel and Congresswoman Nita Lowey.  We will
be working on gaining additional support between now and next January
when the next session opens.                de Frank Fallon   N2FF

> WANTED – Assistance with Central New Jersey Repeater Interference:

In September 2002 at the direction of William Hudzik, W2UDT, ARRL
Section Manager, Hudson Division, NNJ Section, the Monmouth County Local
Interference Committee (MCLIC) was formed in response to a rise in the
number of incidents and complaints of repeater station jamming,
especially to ARES, RACES and NTS nets.

The main focus of MCLIC is the geographic area of Monmouth County, New
Jersey. It exists to address the problems with interference to Amateur
Radio Service Repeater Stations in accordance with the Amateur Auxiliary
to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). As a component of the
Amateur Auxiliary program, Local Interference Committees (LIC) are
commissioned by the ARRL Section Manager with an OO as the Chairman to
investigate and resolve repeater interference problems.

The functions of the MCLIC shall include, but not be limited to:
response to complaints/allegations emphasizing cooperative “no fault”
solutions; signal identification/source location, liaison with Official
Observer Coordinator and ultimately, ARRL Headquarters in difficult
cases.

The MCLIC will operate at all times in accordance with the procedures
stated within the “Amateur Auxiliary Training Guide” and/or other
guidelines developed by the ARRL with complete impartiality to any
individual or group involved in any investigation.

The MCLIC will act as a direct liaison to the Amateur repeater station
sponsors within Monmouth County with programs to foster public relations
between the MCLIC and the area repeater station sponsors to educate the
Amateur community regarding the proper ways to deal with various types
of general interference, deliberate interference and obscenity.

The MCLIC functions as both an advisory committee to the Monmouth County
repeater sponsors on specific cases of Repeater Station Jamming as a
technically proficient committee of investigators gathering and
achieving data.

All repeater sponsors are urged to contact the MCLIC regarding
interference problems to register official interference reports to bring
the particular situation to the attention of the Section Manager.

In addition, in order for MCLIC to carry out is focus, MCLIC is in need
of additional, dedicated volunteers. Especially needed are those
Amateurs that have experience with and the needed equipment for radio
frequency monitoring, recording and Radio Direction Finding (RDF).

For more information or to access the on-line complaint or membership
application forms please visit:
http://www.qsl.net/mclic/

> NY HOSTS PSK GRIDE SQUARE CONTEST

The TARA PSK Grid Square contest (The Grid Dip). Sponsored by Troy ARA,
0000z through 2400z, 2 August, PSK (and speed) and RTTY.
80,40,20,15,10,6 meters. Work stations once per band unless Rover has
changed Locator. Exchange name, 4 digit grid locator. Enter 1 of 5
categories. QRP, 5w max. Low, 20w max. High, 100w max. Rover, 50w max.
as a portable or mobile station operating from more than one Grid
Locator, or SWL. Single/single only. Call CQ Grid Dip. Final score is
QSO points * total different Grid Locators. Mults. count once per band.
To be valid, scores must be received via our online score submission
form found at http://www.n2ty.org/seasons/tara_grid_score.html or e-mail
Logs to grid-manager@n2ty.org, by the last entry date 23rd August 2003.
Logs must be available for review if requested. Please read web rules
for details on http://www.n2ty.org/seasons/tara_grid_rules.html for more
info e-mail to Bill Eddy, ny2u@n2ty.org or Ernie Mills, wm2u@n2ty.org

Originally announced for July 26, the test now occupies the 24 GMT hours
of 2 August.  Please note the change. This test is a wide-open
shoot-out. All bands are included (80 to 6) and PSK31/63 and RTTY are
the weapons available to the participants. There are some unusual rules
including an exchange that includes the 4 digit Grid Locator.  Note also
that only single/single ops are allowed.  Rules at
http://www.n2ty.org/sasons/tara_grid_rules.html

Jump into this one! Multiple mode contests may just be the contest of
the future. But that is not all TARA is doing.

This contest is but an integral part of the new TARA approach to their
contest schedule. After restructuring their calendar they came up with
one event for each season of the year Prefix contest for Spring, Grid
Shindig for summer, PSK Rumble for fall and RTTY Melee for winter. TARA
then decided to create a whole new class of shack wallpaper. Each year a
Digital King or Queen, whoever has the

highest combined score, will be crowned as the BIG ONE. Neat idea! I
trust they have ordered appropriate crowns.

>  DXCC Card Checkers for the Hudson Division

If you have cards to check for DXCC these individuals can do it for you
at hamfests or club meetings.  See http://www.arrl.org/awards/dxcc/ for
information about the program.  The necessary application in PDF format
is at http://www.arrl.org/awards/dxcc/dxccapp.pdf

James Burke WT4Q          NY        ENY
Ben Bond W2PS              NY    ENY
Emil Tillona KD1F        NY    NLI
Steven R. Adell    KF2TI        NJ    NNJ
Eugene M. Ingraham III    N2BIM    NJ      NNJ
Leonard Zuckerman    KB2HK    NY      NLI

> TELEPHONE INTERFERENCE

Do you have persistent telephone interference problems? The problem is
often the phone. “Try the RadioShack ET-296 series phones (e.g. 43-874,
white, $14.99). If this type of phone receives interference, try
unplugging all other phones in the house, including modems, answering
machines, satellite TV receivers, etc. One of these could be generating
AUDIO interference and putting it out onto the phone line. If so, an RFI filter on the offending unit should solve that
problem. RadioShack carries a telephone RFI filter (part number 43-150)
and you can also use the K-Com RF-1.” DSL filters may also work.
(Thanks, Dave K6LL via The ARRL Contest Rate Sheet)

>>>>>APPROVED HAMFESTS:

13 Jul 2003 + Sussex County ARC
Augusta, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey
http://www.sussexhamfest.org
Contact:Dan Carter, N2ERH
8 Carter Lane
Branchville, NJ 07826
Phone: 973-948-6999
Email: hamfest@scarcnj.org

16 Aug 2003 + Ramapo Mountain ARC
Oakland, NJ
Sect: Northern New Jersey
http://www.qsl.net/rmarc
Contact:Bob Anderson, K2BJG
69 Page Drive
Oakland, NJ 07436
Phone: 201-337-6945
Fax: 973-962-6210
Email: rmarc@qsl.net

6 Sep 2003 + Saratoga County RACES Assn.
Ballston Spa, NY
Sect:Eastern NY
http://www.capital.net/~lake/
Contact:Darlene Lake, N2XQG
314 Louden Road, #84
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
Phone: 518-587-2385
Email: lake@capital.net

7 Sep 2003 + Long Island Mobile ARC
Bethpage, NY
Sect: New YorkCity-LI
http://www.limarc.org
Contact:Brian Gelber, WB2YMC
46 Forest Drive
Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 516-822-0673
Email: hamfest@limarc.org

——————————————————————–
ARRL Hudson Division
Director: Frank Fallon, N2FF
n2ff@arrl.org
——————————————————————–